11175: Acronis True Image Home 2009 - Disk Full

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EN4CER
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Joined: 2009-09-26
Posts: 6

Dear All,

I am running Acronis True Image Home 2009 and have a daily incremental backup of my computers C: drive and a weekly incremental backup of my computers D: drive. Today I got the disk full error and noticed my external hard drive is indeed full!

Can I just delete some of the latest or earliest backs in the incremental set or is there a more safer way to create space??

* I have been running backs for about 4 months now.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Win

thomasjk
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Joined: 2009-08-15
Posts: 493

Since you have been using incrementals' you can only delete some of the last backups made. If you delete the earlier ones than the backup chain will be broken. You will want to consolidate the incrementals' and the full archive http://kb.acronis.com/content/1761. You may want to get another external drive for this so you have sufficient space.

EN4CER
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Joined: 2009-09-26
Posts: 6

Many thanks for your help.

I've edited the schedule backup to include 60 days worth of backups

thomasjk
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Joined: 2009-08-15
Posts: 493

That's a lot of incrementals. Be sure to validate each one. If one in the chain becomes corrupt everything afterward won't be able to be restored. You might consider Chain2gen to handle consolidation for you http://forum.acronis.com/forum/5940.

GoneToPlaid
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Joined: 2009-11-14
Posts: 130

EN4CER wrote:

Dear All,

I am running Acronis True Image Home 2009 and have a daily incremental backup of my computers C: drive and a weekly incremental backup of my computers D: drive. Today I got the disk full error and noticed my external hard drive is indeed full!

Can I just delete some of the latest or earliest backs in the incremental set or is there a more safer way to create space??

* I have been running backs for about 4 months now.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Win

Hi EN4CER,

Another option to consider is configuring ATI2009 to do daily differential backups, rather than incremental backups, relative to the full backup. Why? Because a differential backup set always is relative to the full backup and doesn't depend on any of the other differential backups. The differential backup method takes more time and each differential backup will be bigger since differential backups always are relative to the full backup, but this allows you to go back and delete earlier differential backups which you no longer need in order to free up drive space. Deleting previous differential backups in order to free up drive space assumes that you absolutely know that your computer, at the time the most recent differential backup was done, was free of any viruses or malware. If it wasn't and you discover that you have a serious malware infection which can't be eradicated, then your only option might be to restore the full backup if you already have deleted all of the older differential backups in order to free up drive space. At that point and after completing a restore of the full backup, you will have to then mount the most recent differential backup as a drive and then copy any important data files (assuming that those data files themselves are not infected) to your computer's drive. Why? Because restoring the most recent differential backup obviously would also restore the virus or malware infection.

GroverH
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Joined: 2009-08-15
Posts: 8366

EN4CER,
Be careful editing a scheduled task. Actual editing a task is not recommended. It is better to create a new task. Most editing produces unexpected results. If you right click on a task, the right click options are usually safe to adjust.

I endorse the suggestion in post #3. Chain2Gen can help you retain the proper number of backups. A lengthy string of incremental backups is not recommended because if any link in the chain of backups becomes corrupt or non-usable, all newer incrementals in that chain are useless.