7642: Cloned bootable drive isn't bootable

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Susan G
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Joined: 2009-11-29
Posts: 18

Hi-

I cloned a Windows 7 IDE boot disk to a SATA drive, selecting the "Automatic" option in True Image Home 2010.

The cloned drive isn't bootable.

How can I make the cloned drive bootable?

Thanks-

-Susan

Dmitry
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Joined: 2009-04-17
Posts: 953

Hello Susan,

I understand the question and will do everything possible from my side to resolve the issue.

The source of the issue can be any type of USB storage device attached to the machine during the cloning (USB hard drive, card reader etc).

Temporarily detach any USB storage device that is plugged in. Perform the cloning or restore with the USB storage device detached.

If you have an inbuilt card reader, then disable it through Windows Device Manager:

  1. Hit Win-R to get to the command prompt;
  2. Type in devmgmt.msc and hit Enter;
  3. In the Device Manager window locate your card reader (it probably starts with letters SD, MMC etc);
  4. Right-click on the card reader and select Disable.

Also, as a workaround, you can try performing the same operation from Acronis Bootable Rescue Media.

Let me know if you need further assistance.

Thank you.

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Dmitry Nikolaev

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Susan G
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Hello Dmitry-

It would be easier for me to use the Rescue CD, so I'll try that.

Should I remove the original drive before I reboot after cloning?

Also, I have a dual-boot system with XP on one drive and Windows 7 on the other. It's the Win 7 disk I'm cloning. Does that matter -- should I detach the XP drive as well before rebooting? I've read different opinions on this and would like to know for sure.

Thanks-

-Susan

DwnNDrty
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Susan, yes, you MUST disconnect the original before trying to boot the cloned drive for the first time. Just to be safe also disconnect the XP drive.
The problem could be partly caused by the fact you have a dual boot arrangement.
With only the cloned Sata drive installed if it still doesn't boot, you could try a Repair using the Win 7 installation DVD.

Susan G
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Posts: 18

Ok, I'll do that.

So then when I reconnect the XP drive will it automatically see it as a dual-boot system again?

Thanks!

-Susan

DwnNDrty
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Susan G wrote:
Ok, I'll do that.

So then when I reconnect the XP drive will it automatically see it as a dual-boot system again?

Thanks!

-Susan


I think that will depend on how the dual boot was setup. I haven't done dual boot in a long long time. Hopefully someone else will jump in with helpful comments.

Susan G
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Joined: 2009-11-29
Posts: 18

Just to follow up, it worked fine!

Thanks again-

-Susan

george levi
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Joined: 2010-06-06
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hi i have the same problem as suan... i have a new wd sata drive that i cloned ... i set the dirve in my bois to boot first... it didnt boot .. i dont have a card reader to disable ... i have windows 7 os... i did look for a card reader likw you said i counldnt find it ... should i disconnect all other drives ?
hope you can tell me somthing... george

GroverH
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George,
Not much information was provided.

Here are some general rules which results in the fewest problems.

1. Remove the source drive and place it in an alternate locations--such as an external closure, etc.
2. Attach the new blank target drive in its intended boot position--same place from where the source drive was removed.
3. Boot from the TI Rescue CD. Perform the clone from the source to the target.
4. Shutdown and disconnect the source disk.
5. First boot following the cloning should be only with the new clone attached. The source drive or any other bootable drive should not be attached.

The purpose of this procedure is so that Windows can see only the new clone and not be confused by other drives. You can attached other drives later. When Windows boots the first time, you want Windows to have only one choice so it will correctly assign drive letters. If after the cloning, there are some drive letters assigned to non-lettered partitions, you can correct that by using the Windows Disk Managment options.
6. The disconnect of the data cable will suffice for any drive to be disconnected.

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Cloning Risks:
In theory, there should be no risk to the source drive during cloning as the disk is only read. In practice, however, there has been far too many postings of something going wrong during the process. Sometimes it is the operator choosing the wrong disk and cloning the blank onto the master; other times, the power fails during the process; at other times, the computer freezes and the the drive is lost. Simply stated, why take the risk of cloning when it takes on a few minutes longer to do the restore and the master disk is not even connected.
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