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Cloning Failed

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Beginner
Posts: 1
Comments: 0

Just trying to clone my HDD to SSD and it keeps coming up failed, could anyone shine some light on what the problem is thanks.

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Comments: 2914

#1

I noticed following lines in the log:

2019-07-24T20:11:15:945+01:00 11332 E000101F6: Error 0x101f6: A format/resize error.
| trace level: error

error 0x2160008: A format/resize error.

error 0x70008: Resize impossible

2019-07-24T20:12:14:208+01:00 11332 E013C0005: Error 0x13c0005: Operation has completed with errors.
| trace level: error

This suggests that as part of the clone the partitions have to be resized. It would help to know the size and type for both the source and the target drive, and how the target drive is connected. Ah, looking at the original post going from HDD to SSD - is it a SATA SSD, an M.2 NVMe SSD or M.2 SATA SSD?

Am I correct in assuming that you are cloning a drive on which Windows is installed - what version and build are you using (for example Win 10 Pro x64 1903.

While ATI 2018 (later builds(?)) and 2019 allow cloning of OS partition without rebooting, sometimes it does reboot and use a temporary Linux installation. I assume that in your case it did not reboot before starting the clone process.

Have you attempted doing the clone using the recovery media?

Ian

Legend
Posts: 81
Comments: 17679

#2

Ryan, also looking at the log file, you look to be cloning from a 1TB HDD to a 500GB SSD drive and Acronis is having a problem reducing the size of your Recovery partition from 14.24GB to 12.51GB.

The largest partition on the source drive is being reduced from 914.3GB to 451.2GB which hopefully still has plenty of free space on that partition.

I would recommend trying to either Shrink that 914GB C: partition in Windows Disk Management to get it down to around 445GB in size, or else download a copy of the free MiniTool Partition Wizard software and use this to do the same resizing of the C: partition before retrying the clone operation.

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8160

#3

Another option would be to take a full disk backup of the original (recommended before any cloning as a safety precaution anyway) and attempt to restore the backup to the new drive.  If you can't do that, you probably have more data than can fit on the new drive.  Remember, a hard drive's usable space is not what is on the box - you generally lose about 10-15% of usable space from what the advertised size is to the actual usable size once initialized and formatted with a file system.  

Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 8

#4

@Bobbo_3C0X1 

I'd like to ask you what may seem to be dumb questions but, for me, these are very serious questions.  I just can't seem to find a clear answer anywhere in the forum or software documentation.

1)  What is the difference between a full backup and an image backup?

2)  Which type of backup will include the boot partition?

I want to upgrade the capacity of my laptop's hard drive from a 500GB SATA to 1TB SATA.  So far as I'm aware, there is no way to restore a bacup to a USB connected drive.  I would really like to avoid the circumstance of having to reinstall all of my applications and, because it is a laptop, there would be no way to see what works without removing the old drive and replacing it with the new drive which is no easy task ... at least for me.

I have Acronis True Image 2019.  The laptop is running Windows 10 Home v1809.  Recently, I tried to create an Acronis Survival Kit on a WD Passport Drive.  It seemed to be doing something but that ultimately failed and the option is no longer available.  It sure would be helpful if there was a full tutorial, video or text, in the documentation that takes one through the process step-by-step and helps one understand what to expect.

 

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8160

#5

No dumb questions here. 

They are the same. Just my wording as an image can mean lots of things.

A full backup, in this case would be to take a "disks and partitions" backup and select the entire disk and all partitions on that disk will be selected automatically by default.

This is what you want so that you capture everything on the disk.... Data, OS, boot partitions, etc. This is captured in an Acronis True Image .tib file which contains  the "image" of that disk then. When you restore that image, the resulting disk should be basically just like the original and be bootable and contain everything on it again.

As for the survival kit, I'll get back to you. I'm camping and only have a phone. I think I'm going to make a video of how I make my own manually and how to make a survival kit in Acronis. 

Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 8

#6
Bobbo_3C0X1 wrote:

No dumb questions here. 

They are the same. Just my wording as an image can mean lots of things.

A full backup, in this case would be to take a "disks and partitions" backup and select the entire disk and all partitions on that disk will be selected automatically by default.

This is what you want so that you capture everything on the disk.... Data, OS, boot partitions, etc. This is captured in an Acronis True Image .tib file which contains  the "image" of that disk then. When you restore that image, the resulting disk should be basically just like the original and be bootable and contain everything on it again.

As for the survival kit, I'll get back to you. I'm camping and only have a phone. I think I'm going to make a video of how I make my own manually and how to make a survival kit in Acronis. 

Thank you so much for taking the time to answer.  Enjoy your camping trip and I'll look forward to hearing more from you about the survival kit.

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8160

#7

Marjorie, sorry again for the delay.  I finally got around to creating a quick video regarding how to make your own survival kit.  Essentially, just use minitool to create a 2GB parition on any drive you want to be bootable.  Then, use the regular rescue media builder in Acronis True Image (or use the MVP media creator - that would be my vote if you want something a little fancier in the end-product).  Once you have that 2GB partition, you can create rescue media and then updating whenever a new version of True Image comes out is even easier... just make the .wim version and copy and paste it over the existing one.  The video will explain.

Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 8

#8

Thank you very much for supplying a video.  It was very thorough and I truly supply the extra effort you put into it. 

As things turned out, I had successfully accomplished the creation of a survival kit on the Passport external drive when I first tried it.  I guess it was unclear to me that I had done that because nothing told me it had finished or maybe I missed the notification. 

I tested a reboot from the external drive.  It booted and ran wpeinit but seemed to hang on this command:
 "x:\Program Files\Acronis\TrueImageHome\trueimage_starter.exe"

Is that normal? 

I  "x'd" out of that window, rebooted, and then I saw the Acronis recovery system functioning.  I've since discovered that I could have used "alt-tab" to find the hidden window with Acronis True Image 2019 running.

In its infinite wisdom, Windows 10 has broken the home network functionality opting to allow only for network connected drives so the only drives available are on the Passport drive that I use for backups.  I can work with that, I guess.

Now, to work up the bravery to exchange the existing hard drive for the new one that is twice as large and use the recovery kit to restore an image backup. 

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8160

#9

Good deal!

No need to be worried.  Since you are swapping drives, just backup the original, take it out and set it to the side.  Worse case, since you aren't changing anything on that drive, you would just put it back and return to it for the time being. If you don't mess with the original drive, you can't mess it up.

As for WinPE.init - no it shouldn't hang.  It can be a little slow in WinPE to launch AcronisTrueImageStarter.exe (compared to what you might be used to with the booting of the traditional Linux bootable media), but after a few seconds, it should launch ATI correctly.  It might just be that somehow it started in front of True Image and appeared to be hung.  Basically, that command prompt should normally be behind True Image and will remain open with the last run command (which is to first launch True Image).

I'd still recommend trying the MVP media creator.  You'll find that it feels a lot more user friendly as it has it's own file explorer and GUI.  It's not perfect, but for using open-source tools, it is pretty darn nice. Plus it gives you some nice extras like a Web browser, 7zip, etc.

And for the network... well, that can be hit or miss in WinPE within the ATI GUI.  Sometimes, it's easier to mount the network volume as a drive letter and just point Acronis to that.  You can easliy do that with A43.exe file explorer.  It is part of the default rescue media, but you have to use command prompt to navigate to it and launch it.  In the MVP tool, you can use the embedded file explorer and start menu shortcuts to launch it. There's a video of how to use the MVP rescue media builder and what the resulting media looks like too in the 2019 stickies.

https://forum.acronis.com/forum/acronis-true-image-2019-forum/mvp-tool-custom-ati-winpe-builder