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AB12 Weakness - My Opinion

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Forum Member
Posts: 15
Comments: 21

Folks,

One thing I have noticed with this new "web-based" application (Google Chrome, in my case) is it is nearly impossible to do a restore on any of the files in the Google/Chrome subdirectories as they are the same files that are running AB12.  I had to download my backups from the Cloud as a ZIP file, then unZIP them up in an arbitrary directly (i.e., D:\FOO), then copy them over into the Google Chrome directory and subdirectories to get my stuff restored.

Isn't it somewhat of an advantage for a critical operation such as backup and restoring data to have the backup/restore function based on a "stand-alone" application that can operate and over-write any section of the hard drive requested without getting involved in having those files compromise the restore procedure?  Am I making sense here?

Regards,

Chris Tocci

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Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 19

Hello, Christopher

What you are saying does make sense. Although I see the restriction only affects the browser you are using (Chrome in your case), still there should be an obvious way to restore even such data. Right now we offer Boot Media to recover any data, including the one you mentioned.

How we look at data, there are two big sets: system files that makes your OS and core applications running, and custom/user data and custom applications. When your system files somehow corrupted, nothing would help, even standalone application might fail to run, because it uses system API and thus depends on system files consistency. That is where Boot Media is offered as the solution. 

For user data and application, recovery UI that you can use straigh from the system should be offered.

Now, for the desktops, browsers became pretty much part of the core operating system.

We also plan to extend Backup Monitor (that sits in tray) to provide recovery scenarios, which would reduce the dependency on browser.

 

What operating system you are running? If this is Windows, you can use Internet Explorer (11 and above) to recover Chrome files, then continue to use Chrome.

// We all do this anyway for our initial desktop setup, when we use IE to download Chrome/Firefox/Opera/etc, right?

Forum Member
Posts: 15
Comments: 21

Hi Andrey,

Thanks for getting back!  My system is Windows 7 Pro SP1 (64-bit).  You are correct on what you say, but "back in the day" as it were there were backup/restore apps that did not need Microsoft API, NET, etc.  They ran of the most basic kernel (I guess like your bootable media approach...no desktop operating system required, but somewhat slow, but OK, on my system for some reason.)

BTW, when I did use the bootable media CD, put my backup RDX media on it's USB 3.0 port, everything works fine.  However, when attempting to restoring only certain files/folders versus the entire drive (mirror restore), the backup program asks "restoring full pathway" type question and I never know just how to answer this.  Help me understand what this question means.  Usually, just want to restore to the original location.

I and probably most people would want to restore to the original location or give them an opportunity to restore to another folder/disk/whatever.  Does this make more sense than suggesting a full path or not question, especially if one is using this app, it is because something bad has happened and they just want to get back as quickly and correcly as possible?

Regards,

Chris Tocci