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Installing a new HD with no clone image?

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Regular Poster
Posts: 16
Comments: 167

Hi,

If I install a new HD as a main drive,can I restore an Acronis image on it ,if there is no clone image available?

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Posts: 17
Comments: 2991

Hello Babac,

Thank you for using [[http://www.acronis.com/enterprise/ | Acronis Corporate Products]]

Everything depends upon the reason of the impossibility to perform the clone. Why are you unable to clone the hard drive? Could you please describe the symptom data?

Thank you.

Regular Poster
Posts: 16
Comments: 167

Hello Oleg,

I did not say I was unable to create a clone.I was just asking what happens if one of these days I notice my main HD is kaput and I did not make any previous clone, just images.

Thank you.

Forum Star
Posts: 17
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Hello Babac,

Thank you for your response.

You can recover the image using Acronis Bootable Rescue Media. You should plug the new hard drive, boot the system from Acronis Bootable Rescue Media and use Add new disk feature. After that you will be able to restore the archive to the new HD.

Thank you.

 

Regular Poster
Posts: 16
Comments: 167

Hi Oleg,

Thanks for these explanations.

If I can do that with an image, I question myself on the usefullness of the clone feature.

When does one use a clone ???

Forum Star
Posts: 17
Comments: 2991

Hello Babac,

Thank you for your response.

The Backup wizard of Acronis True Image creates an image file for backup and disaster recovery purposes, while the Disk Clone tool simply copies/moves the entire contents of one hard disk drive to another. Here's how both tools work and when you should use them.

When you create an image with Acronis True Image, you get an exact copy of your hard disk, a disk partition or individual files or folders (you make this choice when you create an image archive). If you choose to back up a hard disk drive or a partition, then every portion of the hard disk that has data written to it (sectors) is saved into a compressed file — or multiple files if you prefer. You can save this image to any supported storage device and use it as a backup or for disaster recovery.

When you use the Disk Clone tool, you effectively copy/move all of the contents of one hard disk drive onto another hard disk drive. This function allows you to transfer all the information (including the operating system and installed programs) from a small hard disk drive to a large one without having to reinstall and reconfigure all of your software. Migration takes minutes, not hours, but it is not generally used as a backup strategy.

Thank you.

 

Regular Poster
Posts: 16
Comments: 167

Thanks Oleg for these explanations.

It's hard to understand the usefullness of the clone function as it performs the same goal as the image process.

Unless I miss something in your explanations.

Regular Poster
Posts: 16
Comments: 167

Babac wrote:

Up, please Mr. Acronis!

Forum Star
Posts: 17
Comments: 2991

Hello Babac,

Thank you for your response.

You can use the Clone feature if you need, for example, to upgrade your hard drive to a hard drive of a larger capacity. This operation will take several minutes, and after that you will be able to plug the new hard drive and continue working. You can achieve the same results using the backup/restore procedures, but these operations require more time.

In other words, you can use the Clone option for a "scheduled" maintenance, and you can use the backup&recovery options for the disaster purposes.

Thank you.

Regular Poster
Posts: 16
Comments: 167

Hi Oleg,

Thanks for these explanations.

In other words, the clone feature is just a time-saver feature.It does not do anything that the backup/restore process would not do.

I've always been under the impression that the clone feature was more a marketing device than a usefull one.Please correct me ,anybody, if I'm wrong.

Beginner
Posts: 5
Comments: 8

Hi, all, very interesting thread.

I have recently installed Win7 on a 300GB C: partition of a 650GB HDD. It takes up about 18GB of disk space.

Now I want to change the drive holding the OS from the HDD to a 80GB Solid State Drive.

Please advise me the sequence of operations to do this.

I especially want the SSD to become the C: drive. When I plug it in, should I use any available SATA connector or should I remove the HDD holding the C: drive, then plug the SSD in that connector? Where do i connect each drive and at what point in the procedure.

Many thanks for your advice.
royston Tin.

Legend
Posts: 172
Comments: 11125

Babac,
In my opinion, the users of True Image are divided into two groups.

Group 1 creates regular image archives of the entire disks contents and restore these images onto either the old or a new larger drive when  needed. Some of group 1 will occasionally use the cloning procedure but only after a new backup image archives has been performed. I place myself in this gorup.  Having a disk image to restore is a prudent safey precaution since there have been numberous reports of a botched clone whereby both source and target become non-usable.

Group 2 uses the clone feature to create multiple disks so when one disk goes bad or a larger disk is needed, they install a prior cloned disk or use the clone feature to create a new disk. Group 2 never (or almost never) create image archives for backup purposes. Some clone on a frequent basis and uses this procedure as their backup.

Keep in mind that if a disk fails, it is too late to clone and you need a prior clone for replacement. Whereas, if you have a prior created full disk image archive, you can restore that image. If cloning without a prior created backup image archive, the user is taking an unnecessary risk. Either they are not aware of the risk or they are willing to accept the risk based on their pre-preparedness.

Both procedures can produce the same goal. Cloning to a new disk is quicker with source disk at risk.
Restoring an image to a new disk takes longer without any risk as the source disk does not need to be attached. It's up to the user to make their own choice of methods.

Legend
Posts: 172
Comments: 11125

Royston Tin,

You do not indicate what software or procedure you are planning to use to accomplish this move. I assume it is True Image but what version? Are you planning on performing a clone or restoring a prior create full disk backup image?

I think you might find this link helpful. In addition to the link below, you might want to look at some of the links inside my signature.

http://forum.acronis.com/forum/4196#comment-5187

Beginner
Posts: 1
Comments: 2

This has me wondering. Since cloning is not working for my drive, and my main issue is wanting the programs to continue to work and not need to be re-installed, can you re-assure me that by writing the files to new positions, using the backup and restore option, this won't trigger certain programs to require re-registration? When the data gets onto the drive, and the drive goes into the machine, will the programs continue to function? I do a lot of music, and the music software (Spectrasonics, IK Multimedia, Fxpansion, Arturia, Native Instruments, etc.) can be a bit finicky with registration.