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Moving OS from SSD to M.2 NVMe - Will the New Drive Boot?

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Hi,

I have an Asus Prime H570M-Plus motherboard with a Samsung 850 EVO SSD for my C: drive and a second drive for my data. My OS is Windows 10 Pro, fully up to date. I want to move the C: drive to a Samsung 980 Pro M.2 NVMe drive while leaving the data drive untouched. My plan is to capture a complete image of the 850 EVO SATA drive and restore it using the bootable media to the 980 Pro NVMe drive.

My concern is that the system won't boot because the initial drive is SATA while new drive is NVMe and Windows won't find the necessary drivers.

I'm familiar with the backup and restore operation: in the past, I've backed up and restored many systems to new drives, but they've always been on same interface/bus (SATA). I have tested the bootable media and restored to this system in the past, using only SATA drives, so I'm confident I'll be able to complete the backup/restore. 

Do I need to do anything before I backup/restore? Any advice is much appreciated. 

Thanks,

Darryl

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Darryl,

I would not be overly concerned here.  Windows 10 has native controllers for NVMe drives, they are called Standard NVM Express Controllers and Windows 10 has drivers for this standard controller.

As far as boot goes, I suspect you using a UEFI boot method so Windows boot manager will be carried over in the restore process, likewise for the boot files on a BIOS booted machine.

Since you have experience in restoring just trust your instincts, I think it will all go as expected.

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Excellent. Thanks for your insights into the drivers. Yes, I'm using UEFI boot method.

Darryl

 

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Well, it didn't work. I restored my full disk image to the new MVMe drive, but the computer wouldn't boot. The BIOS recognizes the drive, and I can tell Windows tried to load from the spinning circle, but after a few seconds the computer blue screened with the message: Inaccessible Boot Device. 

I attempted to repair Windows by booting from a Windows 10 thumb drive, but it reported that it could not repair the drive. 

In the end, I re-installed Windows on the new drive. I knew it would take me longer to find a solution to fix the problem than to just re-install. 

I would be interested to know how to do this change from SATA to NVMe for future reference. If anyone has any tips, I would appreciate hearing them. This is probably not the last time I'll have to make this transition. 

 

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Darryl, just to be sure.... your system boots UEFI. Did you boot the rescue media in UEFI too?

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BrunoC wrote:

Darryl, just to be sure.... your system boots UEFI. Did you boot the rescue media in UEFI too?

Yes and Yes. 

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Probably too late now, but did you confirm that the boot device was Windows boot manager rather than a particular drive?

Ian

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Yes, I did.

I had removed the bootable media thumb drive from the system, so the Windows boot manager was the only option. I confirmed this in the BIOS. I could tell Windows was trying to load by the spinning circle that appears once the BIOS screen vanishes. I suspect it choked trying to load SATA drivers when it needed NVMe drivers, but I don't know that for sure, hence my question here. 

I hoped that booting to a Windows thumb drive and attempting to repair the installation would take care of that. Alas, it did not and it reported that Windows could not be repaired. 

Prior to attempting the restore, I used the bootable media to add the M.2 drive to the system. I could see the drive in the BIOS but could not see it as a destination option for the restore until I added it as a drive. Then I selected it as the destination to restore the disc image from by external hdd.

Everything worked as expected, except it wouldn't boot. 

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Did you remove the old source OS disk from the PC before you attempted to boot?  If the original SATA disk was still installed in the PC and you then restored a backup to the NVMe disk which succeeded and subsequently attempted to boot the PC your PC likely experience a disk signature collision which caused the crash.  This happens in situations where two different disks have the same disk signature.  Disk signatures are carried over when a restore is performed to a new disk.

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Yes, I did remove the original disk. It was on the desk beside me. The only other drive in the computer was my D: data drive, which is strictly data. I left it in the computer so when it booted up, Windows would find the location of My Documents, OneDrive, etc. where it expected them to be. 

Thanks for all the suggestions and ideas. 

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If we could go back in time to the setup before installing the new drive...

1. Install the new 980 Pro drive and set it up as a data drive. This is to assure that the drivers are there for it.

2. Using rescue media, back up the C: drive being sure to include all partitions.

3. Remove C: drive

4. Using rescue media, restore backup to 980 Pro.

Would this have produced any better result?

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That's a great idea. I wish I'd thought of that.

The next time I have to do this, I'll give that a try. I wish I could try it now but Windows 10 is loaded and all my apps are installed to the new drive. And, I've repurposed the original C: drive to another use. 

Thanks for the excellent suggestion. 

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Bruno is spot on here.  When using recovery methods to upgrade to differing hardware using rescue media is my preferred method of doing so.  In addition the removal of the source disk should be done in the sequence order Bruno suggests as it removes the source disk from the equation prior to the recovery attempt which lessens the chance for failure.

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I too would approach it the way Bruno suggests.

Ian

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Backup using installed Acronis 2021 on the older computer with SSD, & restoring with rescue media to NVME on the new one (both AMD CPU&mobo) worked fine for me, no issues. 

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Interesting. Thanks for the feedback. 

Maybe it's an Asus or Intel thing and something with my mobo in particular. When I installed Windows 10, I had to install with a local account because there was no ethernet/internet available during the installation process. Once the installation was complete and I got to the desktop, a message popped up immediately saying that an ethernet driver was preinstalled on the mobo and asked if I wanted to install it. Within seconds I had internet and could go to my Microsoft account. 

Maybe there is some other little gem like that which prevented the necessary drivers from activating during the restore process. 

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Avery Andrews wrote:

Backup using installed Acronis 2021 on the older computer with SSD, & restoring with rescue media to NVME on the new one (both AMD CPU&mobo) worked fine for me, no issues. 

 

What are CPUs on the old machine and the new machine?

Mines are FX6300 and Ryzen 5 5600X. Both machines boot in legacy BIOS mode and the system drives are set for  MBR, though both machines support MBR and GPT. UEFI mode boot is available with the new machine but not using it.

The backup was created by ATimage 2017.  Restored W10 did not boot. I tried using the rescue disks derived from  2017 TI and 2021 TI but to no avail.

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Things are less complicated where both PCs have CPU from the same manufacturer. In your case both are AMD CPUs, although the FX6300 dates back to 2012.

I assume you did not accidentally load the recovery media in UEFI mode. Have you ever got the new PC to boot into Windows? Have you confirmed that the bios on the new PC supports the 5600X, older bios for some chipsets do not support 5th generation Ryzen, for example the B450.

Ian

PS If the new PC is using an M.2 drive, you will need to GPT disk, and it will boot using Windows Bootloader not by selecting a particular disk. Also, dim recollection (could be a seniors moment) that M.2 drives only boot if using UEFI.

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IanL-S wrote:

Things are less complicated where both PCs have CPU from the same manufacturer. In your case both are AMD CPUs, although the FX6300 dates back to 2012.

I assume you did not accidentally load the recovery media in UEFI mode. Have you ever got the new PC to boot into Windows? Have you confirmed that the bios on the new PC supports the 5600X, older bios for some chipsets do not support 5th generation Ryzen, for example the B450.

 

The recovery media is loaded in legacy BIOS mode.

I could install the latest version of W10 without any issue(did not need to inject any driver).

The mobo verdor(Gigabyte) confirmed that the BIOS version which came with the motherboard supports 5600X

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I'm out of ideas for the moment.

Ian

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IanL-S wrote:

I'm out of ideas for the moment.

Ian

Ian, be careful how you read this thread. DarrylB was the original poster, but then churin entered the conversation later and I wonder if you may be thinking you are dealing with the same person and the same issue.

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@BrunoC you are correct. Late night for me last night, and not enough sleep. 

@churin, ATI 2017 recovery media is more likely to have issues with M.2 drives than that created with ATI 2021. Please confirm the nature of the recovery media - was it DVD or USB flash drive? Also was the Linux media downloaded from you Acronis account, or created in ATI 2021 and if so was it standard (Windows RE) or Advanced (either Windows PE or Linux)?

Also, what do you mean by it failing to boot? Is there an error message, and if so what? Do you get as far as Windows starting to load? I am not convinced that Gigabyte motherboards support booting from M.2 drives that are MBR rather than GPT. Are you sure that the after the recovery the M.2 drive was actually MBR and not GPT - try booting in UEIF mode, just select Windows boot loader rather than a particular drive. 

Ian