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No OS after redeployment

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Beginner
Posts: 1
Comments: 0

Everytime I attempt to re-image a machine the process completes and the PC retarts like it should but when trying to boot up into the new windows it claims that it cant find an OS on the machine despite me just deploying one. I validated the image I am using so I know its not that, also I have tried this one multiple machines so its not a problem with the hardware.

What would cause this?

Fixes for this?

Any help is greatly appreciated, Thank you.

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Regular Poster
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Comments: 202

Hello,

If the master image contains several disks, make sure that you deploy a bootable disk (disk with OS).

If the target machine has several HDDs, try to select the disk with deployed OS manually from Boot menu. 

What product (version, build) the image has been created with?

Is the system bootable after deployment using Standalone utility?

Best regards.

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 2

I'm having the same exact problem. I wasted two deployment licenses now. I've used a variety of Acronis products in the past and never had this issue. I'm extremely frustrated and the support team is just telling me that I should have used an evaluation key instead. Why can't I test an image before deploying it to production machines without using a license? Why doesn't the image just work?

The master image was created from a machine that has been sysprepped to another machine of the SAME EXACT MODEL AND HARDWARE. I created the image selecting ONLY the operating system partition and made sure to wipe all drives before deployment. I also used the validate image option.

Forum Hero
Posts: 66
Comments: 7764

Andrew, test the deployment with the offline bootable recovery media and the stand-a-lone deployment option.  You will not burn any licenses this way and can use an image on the network as well.  If you have physical access to the machine, this is a good way to test deployment and also to save on a deployment license.

The OS parition is not enough on it's own to be bootable.  You also need to select the system parition (System reserved for a a legacy OS install or EFI for a UEFI OS install). 

This screenshot shows the differences between the 2, but regardless of the type, you need to include the system parition in the deployment to be bootable.  

FYI 1 - if you do use the bootable recovery media directly on the system you want to deploy the image too, start it in the same manner as the source OS was installed with.  If the source image OS was a legacy/bios/mbr install, boot the recvoery media in legacy mode.  If the source OS was installed as UEFI/GPT, then boot the offline recovery media in UEFI mode.  You should be able to specifically pick a boot method using your bios one time boot or boot override menu as explained in this thread.   

FYI - there is no need to sysprep a machine in advance.  There is an option to change SID during deployment which does this on the fly.  This is a handy feature so that you don't have to do this with your base image as you will run up against the re-arm limit if you sysprep an image, update the same image, sysprep it again, more than 3 times.   

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 2

Bobbo_3C0X1 wrote:

Andrew, test the deployment with the offline bootable recovery media and the stand-a-lone deployment option.  You will not burn any licenses this way and can use an image on the network as well.  If you have physical access to the machine, this is a good way to test deployment and also to save on a deployment license.

The OS parition is not enough on it's own to be bootable.  You also need to select the system parition (System reserved for a a legacy OS install or EFI for a UEFI OS install). 

This screenshot shows the differences between the 2, but regardless of the type, you need to include the system parition in the deployment to be bootable.  

FYI 1 - if you do use the bootable recovery media directly on the system you want to deploy the image too, start it in the same manner as the source OS was installed with.  If the source image OS was a legacy/bios/mbr install, boot the recvoery media in legacy mode.  If the source OS was installed as UEFI/GPT, then boot the offline recovery media in UEFI mode.  You should be able to specifically pick a boot method using your bios one time boot or boot override menu as explained in this thread.   

FYI - there is no need to sysprep a machine in advance.  There is an option to change SID during deployment which does this on the fly.  This is a handy feature so that you don't have to do this with your base image as you will run up against the re-arm limit if you sysprep an image, update the same image, sysprep it again, more than 3 times.   

 

Thank you Bobbo, you've been more helpful than support was. I actually discovered this shortly before you posted your comment. I'm glad I can use the standalone disc for testing purposes. I did notice however after I successfully got the image working, even with the option enabled for Acronis to change the SID, it didn't do it because the machine was sysprepped. I suppose this new machine I will have to sysprep again and going forward with new images, just don't sysprep at all.

Forum Hero
Posts: 66
Comments: 7764

Glad to help out.  

Yeah, I imagine that once the image is sysprepped, there's a marker showing it is fresh until it's booted up.  But yup, if you work off that system to keep your baseline updated, no need to sysprep again since you can do it on the fly in Snap Deploy.  It's a nice feature as I have run into the sysprep limitation on a few occassions and had to start over - with Snap Deploy, you never have to worry about that again.

Only other piece of advice - don't use an image of a system that has ever been domain joined - that can lead to weird system behavior down the road.  I always take an image of a completely non-AD joined system and then join the deployed image systems to AD after that - seems to be a much cleaner process that alleviates AD "weirdness" down the road.