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Backing up OS on a PCIe / M2 SSD

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Forum Hero
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Comments: 8216

#101

Thanks for the input Michael - glad to hear all is working well for you too.  

Yeah, I have to leave my system to "other OS" in most cases.  If I go to an actual RAID with the m.2 slots, I have to switchto Windows 8.1\10 and lose teh ability to legacy boot anything.  If I don't safeboot enabled, I can still boot linux rescue media in UEFI mode.

I think the key is that each bios is different in the unique/specific settings that it needs configured.  There are times when I swear my bios isn't really taking my settings to heart after certain changes - I can tell because the onetime boot menu looks "funny" with blanks above where it normally starts with something.  It doesnt' happen often, but it's frustrating when it does.  If I know I've done things right and thigns don't work, I reflash my bios firmware and low-and-behold, everything is good to go again.  This will probably be my last Gigabyte board - I had similar issues with my previous Z77x which led me to upgrade to the Z170X Gaming 3 last year.  I'll probably have this a couple of years before it's time to upgrade CPU's again, but now that I know the qwerks, it's easy enough to manage. 

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#102

Enchantech wrote:

Rohan,

Bobbo's examples for doing this are sound.  In my case I find the ASRock bios more friendly than the ASUS even though both use American Megatrends bios.

Accoring to your last post your first attempt to restore failed due to the default Linux Recovery Media and the WinPE media less the required RAID drives and that would be expected.  You must use the MVP tool so that you can inject the drivers during the build of the WinPE media to work with machines using RAID.

When you get your replacement drive give it a try as Bobbo outlines, I think you will have success.

Hi Enchantech,

 

Just to clarify, I have determined at this point to NOT use RAID (of any kind, certainly NOT 0).  While I knew the risks of RAID 0, I wanted to test it to see it in action.  The performance is better than a single M2 PCIe SSD with two in RAID 0, but the risks are so great, as all who know and understand RAID 0 will tell you all you need is for one drive to fail and the array is done.

Hence my policy for the forseeable future is a single M2 PCIe NVMe SSD as the boot drive.  Hence while at some point in the future it may be nice to move to RAID 0 again, IF the ability to restore rapidly and as seamlessly as possible is viable, and try to get the MVP Tool to work.  Currently time is so valuable to me now that any more time wasted I just can't justify.  This broad range of technical glitches (as well as the ones with Acronis) has cost me dearly.

 

Hence, my priority for Backup/Restore is for the single 960 Evo.  As stated, it's "brother" failed, and once repaired/replaced under warrantly, then this will allow me to test out restores to the second one once available.  I will venture to reach out then when I have got back up to speed on some pressing projects.  Currently my "go to" response to an unrecoverable boot failure is to rebuild from scratch.  (I am still doing Acronis backups, but have 0 confidence any of them will work, or if they do that they won't require more time than building from scratch, which is what has happened so far).

 

Hope that makes sense.  :)

 

 

Forum Hero
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#103

Rohan,

I certainly inderstand your position here.  Yes RAID 0 is a danger as you describe.  In my case I use it and am confident I can recover if need be and I do not have 500 programs to install if I do have to start from scratch for some reason!  I like to push the envelope so to speak so givng new technologies a try are right up my alley if I can afford to do so. 

I do like the performance of the machine.  It is by far the fastest machine I have ever built no question on that! 

Thinking about your woes in this I have one suggestion for you when you attempt recovery to the replacement drive.  Bear in mind that this might not apply to your situation but is something that has caused me grief, not on the ASRock system mind you but another machine I have.  I do a good amount of testing hardware/software and so I am always on the lookout for deals on such.  I had the opportunity to buy a not so well known brand SSD several months ago and took the chance.  I installed that drive into a machine as a secondary drive (non OS).  Later I was testing a restore to that machine and the attempt failed.  The machine did BSOD and complained that an OS device could not be found.  I was amazed at this and set about investigating.  What I found was that this elcheapo drive insisted on presenting itself as the default boot disk whenever it was attached to a machine! So the boot files of the restore were written to this drive and not the target disk!  How this occurred I cannot say but I was able to repeat it.  So the solution was to remove this drive from the mix and that solved the issue.

So I have since practiced my restore attempts to machines having multiple drives attached to detach all disks except the source and taget disk from a machine when restoring.  This has never failed me.  It is my opinion here that the issue is caused by the UEFI bios of some machines.  I think the UEFI spec isn't fully baked yet and that is at root of the issue here.  So, update to the latest bios firmware available and do not have unnecessary drives attached to a machine when attempting OS image restores or even OS installs for that matter!  I live by that practice now and thus far it has proven sound! 

Beginner
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#104

Enchantech wrote:

Rohan,

I certainly inderstand your position here.  Yes RAID 0 is a danger as you describe.  In my case I use it and am confident I can recover if need be and I do not have 500 programs to install if I do have to start from scratch for some reason!  I like to push the envelope so to speak so givng new technologies a try are right up my alley if I can afford to do so. 

I do like the performance of the machine.  It is by far the fastest machine I have ever built no question on that! 

Thinking about your woes in this I have one suggestion for you when you attempt recovery to the replacement drive.  Bear in mind that this might not apply to your situation but is something that has caused me grief, not on the ASRock system mind you but another machine I have.  I do a good amount of testing hardware/software and so I am always on the lookout for deals on such.  I had the opportunity to buy a not so well known brand SSD several months ago and took the chance.  I installed that drive into a machine as a secondary drive (non OS).  Later I was testing a restore to that machine and the attempt failed.  The machine did BSOD and complained that an OS device could not be found.  I was amazed at this and set about investigating.  What I found was that this elcheapo drive insisted on presenting itself as the default boot disk whenever it was attached to a machine! So the boot files of the restore were written to this drive and not the target disk!  How this occurred I cannot say but I was able to repeat it.  So the solution was to remove this drive from the mix and that solved the issue.

So I have since practiced my restore attempts to machines having multiple drives attached to detach all disks except the source and taget disk from a machine when restoring.  This has never failed me.  It is my opinion here that the issue is caused by the UEFI bios of some machines.  I think the UEFI spec isn't fully baked yet and that is at root of the issue here.  So, update to the latest bios firmware available and do not have unnecessary drives attached to a machine when attempting OS image restores or even OS installs for that matter!  I live by that practice now and thus far it has proven sound! 

Enchantech:

 

Oh I hear you re UEFI, add to that NVMe and the whole PCIe approach, chipsets, a smorgasboard of software (esp:  Microsoft, Intel, Samsung,  - and if we're including BIOS ASRock's varient).  Lots of potential for odd things to happen, agreed, and as we see here, often does.  :)

 

So it may be good I've found you and Bobbo once things become more "baked" with NVMe/PCIe SSDs... and all the software and hardware involved.  I like the I/O and with things like Thunderbolt in PC land, latencies etc for lots of things are starting to look really impressive given "humans" probably won't be able to tell the difference in terms of video and sound quality real time. 

 

The ASRock range has really impressed me over the years, and in raw potential, the Extreme 7+ has really rocked.  Very happy with it... trade off is all the glitches so far with other things!  :)  Noted you've had a similar joyfull experience with your 7+.  I too explore, but down specific "tranches" that get me to where I'm aiming to go in performance terms, so can relate.  I kind of feel a kinship for fellow "ASRockers"out there that get the M2 NVMe PCIe space.  Seriously, the first PC I used was the IBM XT 8088/2, which at the time ROCKED, but looking at what we have now at the same level is beyond impressive in comparison, isn't it?

S G
Regular Poster
Posts: 1
Comments: 104

#105

There's a Dell XPS 15 9560 going for $2000 and I was wondering if I got that and used the MVP tools below to create bootable media, will that same bootable media work on my previous generation XPS 15 9550?  

10.9 Advanced (04/11/2017)
5.9 Basic (11/26/2016)   

9560 has :  i7-7700HQ 2.8Ghz  :  32GB 2400  :  4GB GTX 1050  :  1TB NVM PCIE : Killer Wireless
9550 has :  i7-6700HQ 2.6Ghz  :  32GB 2133  :  2GB GTX 960M  :  1TB NVM PCIE : Intel Wirless ?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dell XPS 15 9560:

  • Microsoft Windows 10
  • Intel® Core™ i7-7700HQ Processor 2.8GHz
  • 32GB DDR4 2400MHz RAM
  • 1TB PCIe Solid State Drive ( NVMe PCIE )
  • No Optical Drive
  • 15.6" Touchscreen InfinityEdge 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) Display
  • 4GB NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1050 Graphics
  • Killer 1535 Dual Band Wireless-AC WLAN + Bluetooth 4.1
  • Integrated Widescreen HD Webcam with Dual Digital Mircophone Array
  • 2x USB 3.0 (with Powershare)
  • 1x HDMI
  • 1x Thunderbolt 3
  • 1x Media Card Reader
  • 1x Headset Jack

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dell XPS 15 9550

  • Microsoft Windows 10
  • Intel® Core™ i7-6700HQ Processor 2.6GHz
  • 16GB DDR4 2133MHz RAM
  • 1TB PCIe Solid State Drive ( NVMe PCIE )
  • No Optical Drive
  • 15.6" Touchscreen InfinityEdge 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) Display
  • 2GB NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 960M Graphics
  • 802.11 Wireless-AC WLAN + Bluetooth 4.1
  • Integrated Widescreen HD Webcam with Dual Digital Mircophone Array
  • 2x USB 3.0 (with Powershare)
  • 1x HDMI
  • 1x Thunderbolt 3
  • 1x Media Card Reader
  • 1x Headset Jack

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

( Prices are really low for what you get now, compared to 8088 and later 8086s, then  80286, 80386, 80486...  )

S G
Regular Poster
Posts: 1
Comments: 104

#106

Do you think MVP tools will work seamlessly with New Windows 10 Creator.  I'm going to try and prevent that update from being installed on my systems until it's been out for a bit ( month or two ) before I upgrade.  

Forum Hero
Posts: 613
Comments: 8748

#107

S G wrote:

I'm going to try and prevent that update from being installed on my systems until it's been out for a bit ( month or two ) before I upgrade.  

 

There is a free tool available from a competitor of Acronis' that can switch off the auto updates and a few other Microsoft 'enhancements'. If you do a search for a German based company you should find the tool, then your PC can 'shutup' too. (That's a hint).

S G
Regular Poster
Posts: 1
Comments: 104

#108

Colin,

Thanks.  I'll check it out...

Saw this too...

Turn off Windows Updates in Windows 10

You can do this using the Windows Update service. Via Control Panel > Administrative Tools, you can access Services. In the Services window, scroll down to Windows Update and turn off the process. To turn it off, right-click on the process, click on Properties and select Disabled. That will take care of Windows Updates not being installed on your machine.

See attached pic: win_10_disable_update.png

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Found another option that will also prevent Windows 10 Creator or any other Updates with additional features from being installed...

Go to Windows Settings.  Select Update & Security.  Select Advance Options.  Check box that says:  Defer feature updates.  

 

Defer upgrades in Windows 10

Some Windows 10 editions let you defer upgrades to your PC. When you defer upgrades, new Windows features won’t be downloaded or installed for several months. Deferring upgrades doesn’t affect security updates. Note that deferring upgrades will prevent you from getting the latest Windows features as soon as they’re available.

See attached pic: win_10_defer_updates.png

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Forum Hero
Posts: 36
Comments: 7408

#109

S G,

The WinPE media created with the MVP tool will work on both of the systems you outlined.

Forum Hero
Posts: 613
Comments: 8748

#110

SG,

I'm not sure that will do what you want. As I understand the W10 Microsoft update and monitoring systems, they will automatically turn themselves back on after a week or so.

That may or may not be for the Insider Preview builds only.

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#111

Hi Guys,

 

Well, now Acronis has destroyed my system.  I needed some missing files that were on an earlier SSD boot drive around a year ago.

Hence I restored the older SSD thinking I could just get the data off it.  But no, it killed the MBR and made the 960 Samsung Evo M2 Boot drive unbootable.

 

So, thought I'd use the MVP tool.  Disaster.  I can restore the drive, but NOT get it to boot no matter how hard I try.  I must be missing something, or I'm cursed.

 

This is SO frustrating.  I have spent the whole day trying to get this to work.  I have NEVER been able to restore an NVMe drive with Acronis EVER that will boot.

 

I ensured the BIOS was in SATA mode.  Once the restore was done, I noted the step from Enchantech to shut down, take the media out, then boot after reordering the boot order.  This was unsuccessful.

 

Also, the "boot manager" shows the old Vertex SSD as the boot drive, so something's wrong there.  

 

Do we have an order of what steps to follow for using the latest version of the MVP because I can't find the right documentation, (using the cheap laptop I could easily miss the right info), as I'm confused at several steps as to the correct approach now.  I can see a pile of how to documents, but cannot work out the right one to do this kind of restore.  Most seem relevant to other builds etc, so unclear on this.

 

Anyway, I can see the M2 SSD, can access the restored files so this appears to be good.

 

It is getting it to boot that is the fail point.  This is what has happened every time.  I was so looking forward to the MVP tool restoring the system, but it did not work unfortunately.  I don't know if I followed the correct path as I essentially had to guess these, so could easily of selected incorrectly or missed a vital step.

Also, there was something about setting up a network share, but I don't understand what is going on, if I need it, and if I did, it's funny but it confused me as to how exactly to do this.  I could not locate a document or file or something that tells you how to do the config or something like that.  Not clear if I need this, and if I do, what to do with it.  Just confused by this completely.

 

There were a whole lot of options with Y/N selections, and for each I tried to guess which way to go.  I don't fully understand what these are for and when and how to use them to help to get to the bootable state.

I'm at my wits end again.  This is a nightmare guys, and I suppose if I can't work this out, I'm resigned to doing what I know that works, which is to spend three days or so rebuilding from scratch... AGAIN.  I'll wait a few hours and see if any light can be shed on this, and if not, Any help would be appreciated.

What can I say?  Wish I had better news, but looks like I'm back to square one all over again.  :(

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8216

#112

A few things...

0) Was the SATA mode AHCI to begin with or did you switch it to AHCI mode just to do the restore?  If you made this switch to restore (to get around the RAID issue), then you need to switch back to RAID after the recovery and BEFORE YOU BOOT THE OS.  The OS is configured based upon how it was installed with a pariticular SATA mode.   If you are using the AHCI work-a-round, it usually works, but is not the BEST way to do this.  You should really build winpe rescue media with the MVP WinPE tool and say "yes" to inject custom drivers.  We already provide the IRST (Intel Rapid Storage TEchnology) drivers for RAID mode with PCIE NVME hard drives and you don't need to supply anything else unless you are using a custom RAID controller like LSI, RocketRaid, or something else other than the Intel RAID that comes on most motherboards. 

1) How did you start the restore - legacy mode or UEFI mode?  Please reference screenshots in this post:  https://forum.acronis.com/forum/121829#comment-378318

This is critical.  If you have a GPT PCIE NVME hard drive, your OS install should be GPT and the rescue media must be started in UEFI mode, not legacy mode or your restore will never be bootable.  Your bios settings will determine how the USB boots by default.  It may require you to use your one time boot menu to specifially pick legacy or UEFI mode for USB or DVD booting, if you have a bios that allows both UEFI and legacy (CSM/MBR/Legacy) booting.  Modern bios settings are what get a lot of people because they don't realize that they need to take control of these at the hardware level before rescue media (Acronis or otherwise) can work properly as booting the rescue media in a the right mode makes the difference.  The same applies when you want to do a fresh Windows install.  If you have an MBR formatted hard drive and boot Windows installation media in UEFI mode, it will say no disk found because it will want an GPT disk and not a MBR disk.  The same applies if you have a GPT formatted disk and boot a windows installer in legacy mode becuase it will want an MBR formatted disk and not a GPT disk.  Long story short, rescue media booting in the proper method (UEFI or Legacy mode) is KEY for a successful restore operation.

2) If you did/do that correctly and the restore is a success, go directly into the bios and make sure the boot priority still has the drive listed as the first boot priority.  It's not uncommon that the bios will switch the boot priority to something else "first" like a usb drive as the restored drive won't be listed in the bios until after it's restored and the bios has already assigned something else with a higher boot priority in the mean time.

3) If that's good and you get a Windows blue screen with something to the effect of "no bootable disk found" - you may have a "locked" hard drive.  This is common when windows fastboot / faststart was used and you "shutdown" and then take a backup image whiele the disk is "locked".  This shutdown (where Windows fastboot/fast start was in play) is not a real shutdown, but only hibernation.  Hibernation files can "lock" a drive to protect the hibernation file and the data within it.  To "unlock" a disk, you need to use F8 and do a safe mode boot.  If your system does not have an F8 option, then you can let it fail to boot 3 times in a row.  On the 3rd failure, then Windows should give you an F8 option and that's when you attempt to safe mode boot to unlock the disk. 

I have restored to PCIE NVME hard drives SUCCESSFULLY a number of times.  I regularly test the MVP rescue media and new versions of the default Linux rescue media on my primary home system which uses a PCIE NVME Samsung 950 Pro and it restores fine.  I have also restored to a second MyDidigital BPX PCIE NVME drive and swapped it in place of the 950 and it boots fine too.

 

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#113

Bobbo_3C0X1 wrote:

A few things...

0) Was the SATA mode AHCI to begin with or did you switch it to AHCI mode just to do the restore?  If you made this switch to restore (to get around the RAID issue), then you need to switch back to RAID after the recovery and BEFORE YOU BOOT THE OS.  The OS is configured based upon how it was installed with a pariticular SATA mode.   If you are using the AHCI work-a-round, it usually works, but is not the BEST way to do this.  You should really build winpe rescue media with the MVP WinPE tool and say "yes" to inject custom drivers.  We already provide the IRST (Intel Rapid Storage TEchnology) drivers for RAID mode with PCIE NVME hard drives and you don't need to supply anything else unless you are using a custom RAID controller like LSI, RocketRaid, or something else other than the Intel RAID that comes on most motherboards. 

1) How did you start the restore - legacy mode or UEFI mode?  Please reference screenshots in this post:  https://forum.acronis.com/forum/121829#comment-378318

This is critical.  If you have a GPT PCIE NVME hard drive, your OS install should be GPT and the rescue media must be started in UEFI mode, not legacy mode or your restore will never be bootable.  Your bios settings will determine how the USB boots by default.  It may require you to use your one time boot menu to specifially pick legacy or UEFI mode for USB or DVD booting, if you have a bios that allows both UEFI and legacy (CSM/MBR/Legacy) booting.  Modern bios settings are what get a lot of people because they don't realize that they need to take control of these at the hardware level before rescue media (Acronis or otherwise) can work properly as booting the rescue media in a the right mode makes the difference.  The same applies when you want to do a fresh Windows install.  If you have an MBR formatted hard drive and boot Windows installation media in UEFI mode, it will say no disk found because it will want an GPT disk and not a MBR disk.  The same applies if you have a GPT formatted disk and boot a windows installer in legacy mode becuase it will want an MBR formatted disk and not a GPT disk.  Long story short, rescue media booting in the proper method (UEFI or Legacy mode) is KEY for a successful restore operation.

2) If you did/do that correctly and the restore is a success, go directly into the bios and make sure the boot priority still has the drive listed as the first boot priority.  It's not uncommon that the bios will switch the boot priority to something else "first" like a usb drive as the restored drive won't be listed in the bios until after it's restored and the bios has already assigned something else with a higher boot priority in the mean time.

3) If that's good and you get a Windows blue screen with something to the effect of "no bootable disk found" - you may have a "locked" hard drive.  This is common when windows fastboot / faststart was used and you "shutdown" and then take a backup image whiele the disk is "locked".  This shutdown (where Windows fastboot/fast start was in play) is not a real shutdown, but only hibernation.  Hibernation files can "lock" a drive to protect the hibernation file and the data within it.  To "unlock" a disk, you need to use F8 and do a safe mode boot.  If your system does not have an F8 option, then you can let it fail to boot 3 times in a row.  On the 3rd failure, then Windows should give you an F8 option and that's when you attempt to safe mode boot to unlock the disk. 

I have restored to PCIE NVME hard drives SUCCESSFULLY a number of times.  I regularly test the MVP rescue media and new versions of the default Linux rescue media on my primary home system which uses a PCIE NVME Samsung 950 Pro and it restores fine.  I have also restored to a second MyDidigital BPX PCIE NVME drive and swapped it in place of the 950 and it boots fine too.

 

 

Hi Bobbo,

 

Oh and I would just like to say for the record that what you and your team are doing is GREATLY Appreciated.  Any angst from me is about the situation, and NOT about you guys.  You ROCK, so just wanted to make that clear, and note the considerable efforts you have made here...

So, this is a single M2 SSD in AHCI mode, hence this is not an issue.  Checked the BIOS and this is still set in that mode.
I launched the MVP in UEFI since I intercepted the boot order each time and selected the UEFI version of the USB drive which had the media on it.
I also had checked that the CSM setting is UEFI Only and NOT Legacy.

I selected Y to Inject the custom drivers.

The drive was successfully restored each time, BUT would NOT boot.

 

The Boot Manager still shows the boot drive as the Vertex 4 when this is connected, and nothing shows when it is not.  I would have thought this should have changed.  

I ensured that the boot order had the M2 drive as the top priority.  I then disconnected the Vertex 4 and there were no other drives connected or USBs.

On attempted boots, the error message is a dark screen with the following:  "Reboot and Select proper Boot Device or Insert Boot Media in the selected Boot device and press a key"

 

I suspect the ASRock BIOS needs the M2 listed in the boot manager or it won't boot.  

 

Any other suggestions?

 

 

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#114

Oh, additional items, in "What to recover", I'm selecting whole disk/partitions, but select teh main drive and then the partition separately, is that correct?

Next step from there is to select the location for "Partition C" - I set the location to the M2 Drive, is that correct?

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#115

Also, when launching cmd, and using the "bootrec /fixmbr" command, it does not perform successfully - "The request could not be performed because of an I/O devide error."

This is odd as this is rare that this command fails...  

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8216

#116

The bootmanager listing the vertex4 is because you did an exact restore with mbr and track0. That's ok.

I have a vertex 4 and that's what I migrated to my Samsung 950 pro nvme. As long as you uefi booted the recovery, which is a must for pci nvme, I think the problem is the locked disk. I found my disk locked when going from ssd to nvme and vice versa. Let it fail to boot 3 times and see if you get the f8 safe boot option and use it if you do. Just make sure you are uefi booting your rescue media. Nvme drives must be GPT and uefi to be bootable.

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#117

Bobbo_3C0X1 wrote:

The bootmanager listing the vertex4 is because you did an exact restore with mbr and track0. That's ok.

I have a vertex 4 and that's what I migrated to my Samsung 950 pro nvme. As long as you uefi booted the recovery, which is a must for pci nvme, I think the problem is the locked disk. I found my disk locked when going from ssd to nvme and vice versa. Let it fail to boot 3 times and see if you get the f8 safe boot option and use it if you do. Just make sure you are uefi booting your rescue media. Nvme drives must be GPT and uefi to be bootable.

No go.  just keep getting the dark screen with the following:  "Reboot and Select proper Boot Device or Insert Boot Media in the selected Boot device and press a key"

 

I did this over 10 times in a row.  I do not know how to get to safe mode.  F8 does NOT work either.

 

This is something entirely different going on I think.  Whatever it is has prevented any restore EVER by Acronis for the NVMe drives.  The drive should show up when using the cmd bootrec /fixmbr etc.  No idea what is preventing the 960 from being added to the MBR.

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#118

Bobbo,

 

How would I restore to the Vertex 4?  Will the MVP work for that, or do I need the Universal Restore (or, how would I enable teh MVP to leverage Acronis Universal Restore - I'm not clear on how to do this with it)?

Forum Hero
Posts: 68
Comments: 8216

#119

Nothing changes. You should not need Universal restore on the same motherboard.

If UR is already installed in the machine, the advanced tool will automatically add it into the build. It will be under start button and programs.

That's  a good test to return to the vertex with a restore. Give it a shot but pull the nvme out first.

One last thought and hope you don't have too, but may be the key. Reflash your bios firmware with the same version or newer. I've had to do that on my gigabyte boar twice now. The stupid thing refuses to update the hardwarecitvknows sometimes and the boot menu doesn't reflect the changes until I reflash. Maybe that's what yours is doing too since you say it still shows vertex in the boot menu with no Windows boot manager in the name.

Beginner
Posts: 0
Comments: 18

#120

Hi Bobbo,

 

Thanks for those ideas.  I did reflash the BIOS and reset to defaults.

I entered the M2 960 into position 1 on the Boot Manager.

 

Unfortunately the boot attempt failed - Error message attached.

I then tried to repair via windows media.  Failed.

After that, there are now NO bootable drives at all, and the second black screen with text is attached:

 

Totally stumped so far.  Acronis Tech suggests attempting with trial version of Acronis 17 and taking shots of each step and the results.

 

Running out of ideas and time unfortunately.  Looks like I'm back to rebuilding from scratch - current estimate to do that is now more like 4-5 actual days...  "Fun!".  :)  If the Acronis Tech can't help I think we'll have to call it a day and accept for this sytem Acronis does not work.

 

Not sure what to do from here either as I'm sure this will happen again.   Well, at least we tried everything that was possible, and I thank the community here for the tremendous support.  It's a shame this is not a simple fast restore, and honestly it probably would have been much easier to run with nothing at all, and just rebuild each time.  From now on, if this fails, that's what I'll have to do.  I may road test some other Backup products, but I'm not going to hold my breath.  NVMe apparently is just too advanced for the PC end of the backup market unfortunately to be able to use it consistently and effectively from my experience.  I also suspect Microsoft are a major part of the problem as I suspect a lot of this is their retarded OS which still apparenlty has old code still working.  Hence may go and see what the Microsoft technical people have to say this time.

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#121

Second pic missed in the previous post:

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#122

Please see attached shot when at the "Select Items to Recover" stage:

 

Clarification:

 

Should I recover everything, just the individual MBR and NTFS checkboxes for disk 7, or some other combination?

It occured to me that the disk 2 listings may be relevant with MBR data (which would explain a lot).  The issue with this is that there are several of these, and if I was to attempt to recover these at the same time, end up having to use multiple drives to do this.

By the way, if these partitions are sent to a drive, will this over-right everything?  I'm reluctant to do this and lose yet more data, potentially TBs of data... !!

I have not yet found documentation etc that spells this out, hence wanted to check first before proceeding.  :)

 

 

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#123

Aha!  Just found documentation saying NOT to select the MBR and Track 0 boxes...

 

Also, I do know that the EFI Systems were critical to installing windows on the NVMe drive.

So, current thinking is to select the recovery, EFI and main partitions... 

 

The main problem with this is that in order to enable the disk signature to be retained, the MBR and Track 0 box for disk 7 needs to be checked...  Hmmmm

 

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#124

Success!  The combination that finally worked was to include all except the first MBR Track Box 0.

The second (for disk 7) was necessary, and allowed for the "Disk Signature" to be retained (which is really helpful as it seems all the proprietary software I run worked without issue - at least those I've tried initially).

 

Thanks Bobbo!  Just having someone else to bounce ideas off and knows this subject area well is a tremendous help. I was honestly about to give up completely, but tried to apply Occam's Razor - and it seems these were the last pieces of the puzzle.  I must say, it's not very clear on what to do in these situations.

The relevant documentation was in a link Udaya from Acronis Tech support listed.  This gave me a clue that the right combination and location of the partitions might be where the problem was, which it turned out it was.   Looking back this makes perfect sense, as the location of the EFI partition is critical to the restore, given it was vital to have a SATA SSD in place to install in the first place.  It did not occur to me until now that this in effect is critical to restroring the NVMe drive.  Also, the recovery partition needed to be located in the exact partition space on the NVMe SSD boot drive.  Also, including the MBR Track Box 0 from the SATA SSD I believe could have impeded the process, and when it was NOT selected - this was the variation that worked.

 

I'm not sure if this is unique to the ASRock BIOS, or if this is necessary for other MB's BIOS settings to work.  Enchantech has the same MB as I do, so maybe he may be able to shine a light on this for future "ASRockers"running NVMe M2 PCIe 3 x4 SSDs.

Anyway,  I wanted to say thanks, and provide information as a future reference to help others in the future.

On a personal note, I'm greatly relieved as I have tight deadlines, so appreciate the patience and information greatly.  LOL, I may even be able to let my hair grow back now.  :)

S G
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#125

Saw email about 2018 Beta program.

 

When does 2018 Beta Program start, end?

I'm thinking of getting a new laptop just to use for the 2018 Beta that way I don't care what happens to that laptop when:

 

a. creating disk images and restoring back to the system

b. creating incrementals and restoring back

c. performing live full backups / system image creations...

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#126

S G, the 2018 Beta program has started already in the last couple of days. If you register for the program you will get access to the Beta forum for the same.

Typically, the Beta program will finish when Acronis are ready to start announcing the availability of the public product to their customers and the beta forums will close soon after that.

I am running the 2018 Beta on a vanilla Windows 10 partition in a dual-boot scenario on my laptop.

S G
Regular Poster
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#127

Is there any reason to have Acronis True Image ATI 2017 installed on my system if I never use it to do any live or scheduled backups?

 

I think I originally installed it to create bootable media.

 

Now I just use MVP builder to do that so I want to uninstall ATI from my system.

 

Again, I do not use ATI application on my windows 10 system ever and would like to uninstall it...  Is there any reason why I should not?

 

 

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#128

S G, if the details in your signature is correct, then the key reason to have ATI 2017 installed on your computers is to take advantage of your subscription which will give you free upgrades to new versions while that subscription is active.  The MVP Tool media builder requires ATI 2017 or later to be installed in order to work.

S G
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#129

I'm going to do some research on the forums, but wanted to present question to this thread and group of experts before doing so...

XPS 15 9550 & XPS 15 9570 both with Samsung EVO NVMe SSD m.2

 

Is it possible to clone from the m.2 internal ssd to the m.2 ssd that's in an enclosure?  Then put the external m2. ssd into the system and have it boot without any issue?  Previous versions of Acronis would not permit this and I'm just wondering if Acronis 2019 will...

Before had to put new drive in laptop, put original drive in a USB enclosure, then clone from the m.2 in the enclosure to the m2 in the laptop...

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

I just installed Acronis 2019 on two of my laptops running WIndows 10...

I purchased a Samsung T5 1TB SSD that has a USB 3.1 C interface to store my backups, since reads / writes to this drive are super fast.  Once backups are completed I transfer files to larger slower storage...

.

XPS 9550

No problems doing following:
1. Using Acronis App while inside Windows 10
2. Booting from Acronis USB

 

XPS 9570

1. Using Acronis App while inside Windows 10 - no problems
2. Booting USB created with Acronis Survival Kit
a. did not work with drive encrypted
b. had to unencrypt the drive for this to backup

 

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#130

Is it possible to clone from the m.2 internal ssd to the m.2 ssd that's in an enclosure?  Then put the external m2. ssd into the system and have it boot without any issue?  Previous versions of Acronis would not permit this and I'm just wondering if Acronis 2019 will...

Before had to put new drive in laptop, put original drive in a USB enclosure, then clone from the m.2 in the enclosure to the m2 in the laptop...

I would recommend using the same procedure as before and putting the new drive internally and the old one in the enclosure. This should avoid any issues with the enclosure introducing new device drivers for the new drive by using this as the Source not the target.

XPS 9570

1. Using Acronis App while inside Windows 10 - no problems
2. Booting USB created with Acronis Survival Kit
a. did not work with drive encrypted
b. had to unencrypt the drive for this to backup

None of the Acronis bootable media, including the Survival Kit has any support for encrypted drives so this is correct operation.  It is possible to include BitLocker support in Acronis boot media by using the MVP Custom ATI PE Builder tool but you would still need to unlock the encrypted drive before ATI will access it.

S G
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#131

Steve,

Thanks for the quick response

  • Other than generic security what's purpose of encrypting boot drive ( only drive in system )?
  • Will Encrypting only drive in my XPS laptop prevent hackers installing & implementing ransomware?

 

I've been up all night doing a bit of research...

There's a USB NVMe PCIe M.2 Enclosure on Amazon that seems like it will allow me to:

a. clone directly from internal NVMe, PCIe, M.2 SSD to an new NVMe, PCIe, M.2 SSD placed in this enclosure.

b. boot directly from cloned M.2 in enclosure via USB 3.1 C port afterwards

  • Some of the reviews on Amazon for this enclosure mentioned they didn't open their iMacs
  • They cloned the internal drive in iMac to Samsung 970 Evo in enclosure mentioned above
  • Boot from M.2 drive in the enclosure mentioned above without any issues...

 

I'm going to get the NVMe PCIe M.2 Enclosure and Samsung 970 EVO 1TB - NVMe PCIe M.2 hopefully today if available, otherwise; within two days...

Then see if I can:

  • Clone directly to the Enclosure
  • Boot off Cloned SSD in Enclosure
  • Put Cloned SSD in Laptop and boot off it

 

You mentioned there could be some issues with drivers.

  • If I'm able to successfully clone to the enclosure mentioned above
  • And I placed cloned drive in laptop
  • Won't all drivers already be installed on clone drive?
  • So Windows 10 " shouldn't " have any issues?

 

Again, thanks in for your patients in dealing with my questions...

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#132

Thanks for the quick response

  • Other than generic security what's purpose of encrypting boot drive ( only drive in system )?
  • Will Encrypting only drive in my XPS laptop prevent hackers installing & implementing ransomware?

Encryption is primarily a security mechanism for safeguarding your data should your computer be stolen.  When your OS is active then encryption is unlocked so would not prevent malware or ransomware infection or hijacking - that is the province of your security protection mechanisms, i.e. antivirus, firewall etc but these are only as good as the decisions made by the user!

There's a USB NVMe PCIe M.2 Enclosure on Amazon that seems like it will allow me to:

a. clone directly from internal NVMe, PCIe, M.2 SSD to an new NVMe, PCIe, M.2 SSD placed in this enclosure.

b. boot directly from cloned M.2 in enclosure via USB 3.1 C port afterwards

  • Some of the reviews on Amazon for this enclosure mentioned they didn't open their iMacs
  • They cloned the internal drive in iMac to Samsung 970 Evo in enclosure mentioned above
  • Boot from M.2 drive in the enclosure mentioned above without any issues...

Some docking stations / enclosures do provide hardware cloning solutions - I have one for SATA drives that does this but always requires that the drive sizes match or the target drive be larger than the source drive as they do not provide for shrinking the data!

Mac OS may allow for the OS to be booted from an external enclosure but please be aware that Microsoft do not allow this for the Windows OS unless you are prepared to pay for their Windows Enterprise edition.  Otherwise Windows Home or Pro cannot boot from an external USB drive.

You mentioned there could be some issues with drivers.

  • If I'm able to successfully clone to the enclosure mentioned above
  • And I placed cloned drive in laptop
  • Won't all drivers already be installed on clone drive?
  • So Windows 10 " shouldn't " have any issues?

If you use the enclosure hardware clone then this should be a bit for bit copy of the original drive including all installed drivers etc.  When you install the cloned (target) drive in your laptop, then Windows may detect new hardware and install new drivers for that hardware if the drive is a different make or model etc.