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Acronis bootable Rescue Media and cloned disks/partitions on the same SSD

Beginner
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Comments: 4

I'm thinking of creating a bootable external SSD with Acronis Rescue Media in it, and to store there all my PCs’ cloned disks or OS partitions. My rationale is: this way I can have all of my PC-lifesaving stuff in a single place; when a PC fails and is in need of a Restore, I plug in this SSD of mine, and off we go. My questions:

  1. Is it doable?
  2. Is it a good idea, or is there a better alternative?
  3. Any special considerations I’ve gotta keep in mind?

NB This will not be the only place cloned partitions will be being saved; there’s a parallel plan for cloning disks or partitions on HDD’s, as well — this is almost obligatory for my big non-OS partitions.

Legend
Posts: 31
Comments: 11512

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Zazula, welcome to these User Forums.

Please see KB 1540: Difference between Backup and Disk Clone which is important given your use of the term 'clone / cloning'.

It is not possible to do what you ask when using cloning.  Each new clone would wipe out the entire SSD if it is selected as the target - this is how any clone works.

It may be possible to do something very similar but there are a number of warnings needed here:

If you use the Acronis bootable Rescue Media Builder tool to create the rescue media on your SSD, this will only work if the SSD is formatted as FAT32 and only if it is seen as a removable drive, plus it will also wipe out the whole drive when doing so!  Rescue Media cannot be created on NTFS formatted media.

A much easier approach for what you want to do would be:

  1. Create the Acronis Rescue Media on a small USB stick (size 1GB up to maximum 32GB).  USB sticks are relatively inexpensive and you could create a couple of different types / versions of Rescue Media, i.e. the older Linux based media, and the newer Windows PE media.  
    Make sure to test the media on your computer to ensure it works well and can see / access your disk drives (internal and external).
  2. Format the new SSD external drive as NTFS (with GPS if using UEFI) and use this to store multiple backup image (.TIB) files for your different PC's in separate folders for each computer.

In the event of a recovery scenario arising, connect the external SSD and the USB rescue media and boot from the latter. 

Beginner
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Comments: 4

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Thank you very much, Steve, for your spot-on answer! i'll do as advised.

 

PS Yup, I meant '.tib images' by the term 'clone', and this is incorrect terminology; sorry.

Beginner
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Comments: 4

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One more question:

For the 2nd step ["Format the new SSD external drive as NTFS (with GPS if using UEFI) and use this to store multiple backup image (.TIB) files for your different PC's in separate folders for each computer"], can this SSD have password protection?

Legend
Posts: 31
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Rather than adding password protection to the whole SSD, you can encrypt each of your .tib files using the protection settings found on the Advanced options page of the Backup task configuration.

2018-01-01 11_06_12.png

The above Backup protection / encryption settings are available for Disks & Partitions backups as well as for Files & Folders backups.  Once encryption is set for a backup then this cannot be changed and the password cannot be recovered if you forget or lose it, so make sure you protect this too (i.e. use a secure password safe application).

Beginner
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Comments: 4

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Once again thank you, Steve, for your great and prompt response!

All my best for a happy new year for you and your loved ones! :)