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I recovered my SSD and stopped the recovery ***immediately*** now I have to choose the OS to load

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I was recovering my SSD, when it said the file system it was going to use was NTFS. I got nervous and stopped the recovery. It turns out that Acronis was right, it was using the NTFS file system after all...Anyway, When I tried to recover the SSD with the 10.2.2019. it said (essentially) Vol.2 was missing.

So, now I couldn't get into Windows ***at all***. Not a problem. I (fortunately) had the foresight to make a Windows .iso. when I bought this computer.

So, I ran the .iso file, and I'm back into Windows.

The problem is, before I can get to the desktop, the (winbootloader,I suppose,) wants to know: do I boot Windows 10 or Windows 10 on Volume four.

How do I return it to where it will run the Win 10 Vol4 automatically?

Thanks in advance,

CotS

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Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26782

I was recovering my SSD, when it said the file system it was going to use was NTFS. I got nervous and stopped the recovery. It turns out that Acronis was right, it was using the NTFS file system after all...Anyway, When I tried to recover the SSD with the 10.2.2019. it said (essentially) Vol.2 was missing.

So, now I couldn't get into Windows ***at all***. Not a problem. I (fortunately) had the foresight to make a Windows .iso. when I bought this computer.

So, I ran the .iso file, and I'm back into Windows.

The problem is, before I can get to the desktop, the (winbootloader,I suppose,) wants to know: do I boot Windows 10 or Windows 10 on Volume four.

How do I return it to where it will run the Win 10 Vol4 automatically?

Sorry but I am a little confused here myself...

First, you stopped the recovery of your SSD but then tried to do this again but got a 'missing Vol 2' error that didn't show in the first attempt?

Next, you then recovered Windows from a Windows ISO (which I presume means you effectively did a clean install of Windows??), and after doing so the system doesn't know which copy of Windows 10 to boot from?

So, is this a dual-boot system with 2 copies of Windows 10?  How many disk drives does it have?

Having aborted the initial ATI recovery, I have to ask why you didn't just wipe the SSD and start over again rather than leave it in an unknown state?

If you did a clean install of Windows, then I don't understand why you didn't choose Vol 4 as the install target for the OS when asked where to install?  Also why the boot loader would even know about any OS on another volume in the computer?

I am assuming that the above actions were all done using bootable rescue / install media?

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Sorry for the confusion. Let me try to clear that up.

Initially on the Win.iso (on the USB drive,) I chose the conservative coarse. Please keep all files, and don't format the drive. The .iso responded, (for lack of a better phrase,) "That option is not available when booting from a USB Drive". So, I had to format the entire drive, and then install.

That's why I'm confused as you are.

At any rate, the .iso then said, We'll keep your older windows file around so you can access them." But I never thought I'd have to choose which OS to boot into. Infuriating.

When I started the "upgrade," to windows 10 there was not a Vol. 4 for me to target. It made it during the "upgrade" process.

About knowing about another OS on the system, I think that stems from the Original OS the on they call "Windows 10" vs. "Windows 10 on Vol. 4" And I don't know why kept the Original OS for me to access, in case I needed those files. So now, I have 2 OS's The original one, (that won't even boot, because I chose it just to see,) and "Windows 10 on Vol. 4"

Fortunately, (or unfortunately) depending upon how you want to look at it, I only have 1 SSD where all this is taking place.

 

 

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Thanks for the update and clarifications.

Anytime you boot from Windows install media (ISO) you will only have the options you saw - this is because the options for doing an in-place upgrade of Windows is only available when you start the process from an active Windows desktop.

When Windows keeps files from your old OS installation, then this is stored in a folder on your C: drive called 'Windows.old' and is not a bootable OS that you could go back to, just a folder where you could find some files if needed.

As far as the boot menu options showing two choices here, that seems to be caused by the Windows BCD (Boot Configuration Data) store being confused and will require this to be repaired.

See webpage: How to Rebuild the BCD in Windows

Regular Poster
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I'm trying to follow the instructions of getting to the command prompt. The thing is, a) when when I installed this version of Windows, (the one on Vol.4) during the setup, the program asked me for a "PIN" to replace passwords. I tried to bypass the screen, but I couldn't do it. Anyway I made up a PIN, and have the PIN.

So, to get to the Command Prompt, Windows is asking me to " Insert the password for this account." I've tried the PIN I created during the setup, and other passwords I entered during setup.

None of them work.

Would it be okay if I used the command prompt inside of the windows program, (with elevated privileges) and if not, how do I resolve this situation?

Thanks for your help,

CotS

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What type of BIOS boot is your Windows 10 OS using here?  (Sorry, should have asked this earlier as can be important!). 

Is it UEFI or Legacy?

If you can boot into Windows 10, then run the command msinfo32 and look at the BIOS mode shown in the right panel.

If you have a Legacy system, then you could download and use the free EasyBCD tool to rebuild your BCD files and/or edit the menu entries from within Windows.

If you have a UEFI system, then you can still use EasyBCD but will get a warning when it is launched that some of its features are disabled on UEFI systems.

I would recommend using the Backup Settings button before making any changes, plus you can use the top View Settings option to see how the current BCD shows your boot menu options.

If you see unwanted entries in the list shown, then click on Edit Boot Menu where you can select the unwanted item and then click on Delete to remove it.

Note: Click on the Save Settings button after making any changes.

Hopefully, using the above tool will help here.

Regular Poster
Posts: 44
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Thanks Steve,

After some difficulty, I finally d/l'd the community edition.

My question is: which drive/device should I "delete?"

Thanks in advance,

CotS

 

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Legend
Posts: 106
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If you compare your entries with those from my screen image, then Entry #2 looks to be the one to be deleted.