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Acronis True Image 2019 From Bootable USB Freezes after 3 or 4 screens

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Beginner
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My Dell laptop boots from the ATRI Bootable Recovery USB (created by the Dell laptop). ATRI functions but it freezes after about 3 screens so I can never complete the recovery process. What can be done to fix it.?

Thanks, Murray

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Legend
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Murray, which type of Acronis Rescue Media have you created / been using here?  Plus how are you booting the media in respect of the laptop Windows BIOS mode used for booting?  See the following reference documents.

KB 59877: Acronis True Image: how to distinguish between UEFI and Legacy BIOS boot modes of Acronis Bootable Media

KB 61632: Acronis True Image 2019: how to create bootable media - for details of the 3 different types of rescue media.  Default Simple mode uses Windows Recovery Environment, then Advanced mode offers the older Linux media or Windows PE (using the Windows ADK).

Forum Hero
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To add to Steve's questions.. how long is it "frozen" for as well?  If it is freezing while navigating or reviewing a .tib backup, you may need to give it some time to complete that portion of the recovery.  

Personally, I would create the WinRE version of the rescue media so that it automatically includes all of the local system drivers (which might also include custom storage controller, USB controller or docking station drivers).  It may still take some time to open the .tib once you select it though.

Beginner
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Hi Steve, thanks for the reply. I prepared the Bootable USB stick with the Acronis Media Builder and selected the Simple Option.  The MSINFO of the PC indicates it is booted in Legacy mode. When I insert the USB and restart the PC, I hold the F12 key to go into the Boot Options and the display is:

+Hard Drive

+USB Storage

CD/DVD/CD_RW

Removable Devices

Network

I select +USB and  Acronis starts up within a few secs. 

After a few screens Acronis frezes. The only thing that works is the mouse.

Thanks for any input,

Murray

Legend
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Murray, thanks for the further information.

After the rescue media has booted and you are at the Acronis offline panel, what next actions are you taking before you reach the point where things freeze?

What happens if you just browse through the various options on offer without actually starting either a backup, recovery or clone type action?

Beginner
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Hi Steve, it's in the browsing mode that it freezes. I select Restore and try to browse . Sometimes Acronis comes back with the contents on the hard drive but sometimes it freezes while browsing. But it never gets into an action because it freezes after the 3rd or 4th screen. Does not appear to be dependent on which menu (left side or top) is selected.

BTW, the Bootable USB stick also contains Universal Recovery but when the stick boots up I only select True Image and not the UR section. Do you think I should create a bootable USB without the UR module on it?

Thanks, Murray

Legend
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I select Restore and try to browse . Sometimes Acronis comes back with the contents on the hard drive but sometimes it freezes while browsing. But it never gets into an action because it freezes after the 3rd or 4th screen.

Sounds very much like the media is scanning for backup .tib files on all connected drives where this can take a while to complete, especially if you have a lot of such files.

How long have you waited for the 'freeze' to free up again?

If possible disconnect any drives that are not directly needed for any restore operation.

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Agree with Steve here.  Disconnect all drives (internal and external) that are do not hold the backup file you wish to recover.  This should improve the search by the app for backup files.

What type of device is it that your backup is on?  If in is a network share or mapped drive this can cause freezing as well.

Beginner
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Thanks folks but here is the situation. There are not external drives connected and there is only one internal drive in the laptop. There is a window - for approx the 1st two mins after ATI has booted up of the USB drive, where I can click on every side panel menu (Home, Backup, Recovery, Tools, where each window will open and I can go back and forth. However after approx 2 mins is over, ATI freezes where ever it was. The mouse will move but nothing else works including exit. The only option I have is to power down the laptop manually. There is nothing unusual about the configuration that should be cause any of the conflicts you have mentioned. The tools should also be able to work in order for the user to do some drive prep work before beginning to recover a backup file.

I guess I will try to flag this to an Acronis customer service tech because the recovery part of the app is not usable on this PC. I will let you know if I find a resolution.

Thanks and regards, Murray

Forum Hero
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Murray,

You might try disabling your network connection prior to booting to the recovery media.  The media app scans network connections for backup files so a problem in networking  with the recovery media may be at work in your situation.

Beginner
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Enchantech, thanks for your replies. After ATI has booted up, I can move my mouse over the left side Menu list: 

Home, Backup, Recovery, Log, Tools& Utilities. Each button will light up as I move the mouse from one to the next one without actually selecting any. After about 1.5 to 2 minutes, ATI freezes up. The last button the mouse was over lights up and stay frozen that way. I waited 15 mins and nothing changed - it was frozen. It had not been sent to check network options or perform any actions. There are no external devices attached. 

I submitted a help ticket to Acronis customer support but I have not heard any input. I will just hang in here for another couple of days and post any solution or source of the problem.

Cheers, Murray

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What type of recovery media was created on the laptop? Linux, winpe or WinRE? 

Also, what OS version was used to create it? We've found that creating winre media with windows insider preview builds is often very buggy due to the WinRE not being complete by MS in insider builds.

I would recommend downloading current mainstream ADK from MS (1903 is available as of yesterday). Install it and the Winpe component and rebuild rescue media with the Acronis advanced option and ADK.

Prior to that, I would recommend using diskpart /clean on your usb thumb drive and initializing it as a new fat32 patletition in windows disk management. Then build the Winpe and try it out.

Also, are you sure it's completely frozen? Try right clicking the desired tib to see if it gives the recovery option from there. At times, I've started a receiver and picked a .tib and the options to proceed don't show up. Right clicking the selected .tib again gives a recovery option and allows me to proceed after that.

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Bobbo, thanks for your inputs. I have solved the problem as follows:

I ran the boot media builder and selected Advanced.  Before the Advanced mode would proceed, it directed me to MS and had me download and execute ADK setup and ADKWINPE setup (which took about an hour). The builder in Advanced Mode then proceeded to calculate and places the files on the USB stick.  I then booted off the USB stick and it worked fine. It had a whole different look with MS Tiles showing as it started up, and behind the ATI graphics was a windows command line X:\windows \ system32> winpeinit. 

I went back to the Boot Builder and created another USB using the Simple method (WinRE). It had the same graphics and loaded the same as the WinPE version and the file was 100MB larger, but it was also fully stable and  the Win command line ran in the background as well. 

There is definitely some problems with the Acronis S/W and that is disappointing. Also I inserted a brand new 64GB Sandisk USB and the boot builder said it was unable to wirte to it. I inserted the USB into my Windows 7 PC and it said the USB was not formatted so I let it format exFAT and only then when I inserted it into the Windows 10 Laptop did the boot builder recognize it as a functional USB and presented a dialog box requesting to reformat it (FAT32 I presume). 

All I have to say is that I am sorry Norton Ghost pulled out of the Backup market. 

Cheers, Murray

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Murray, 

There is some compound info/problems here.

The new USB disk not being formatted or initialized should have been detected by your original system (assuming Windows 10) as well as Windows 7.  Each new drive (external USB, flash USB, internal, etc.) can be formatted differently by manufacturers.  It's not uncommon that a new drive will not be initialized at all, and should be standard practice to initialize it with Windows disk management and format it as desired.  Most USB flash drives default to FAT32.  If the drive is not initialized and not available to Windows, Acronis will not be able to use it as a target for rescue media creation since it is a program that runs on top of Windows... not available to Windows, not available to programs that run in Windows.

As for the rescue media variances... the default from Acronis is a Linux distribution which is a small build based off of busybox.  Linux is a free distro that can be distributed and that is why you'll see a pre-staged .iso of the Linux rescue media in your account downloads.  It does the job in a pinch, but falls short in driver support on many new systems that have requirements for RAID (IRST for PCIE NVME drives often come set in RAID by default from the computer manufacturers like HP and Dell).  Windows PE and RE are not allowed to be distributed "built" per the Microsoft terms of service.  You must create it on a fully licensed version of Windows OS.  ADK is the manual method to create WinPE and WinRE can be built if you have a good recovery environment partition already.

The reason WinRE is larger than WinPE is that it includes other packages by default, not found natively in ADK - some of which include the local system drivers (the system where the winre was taken from), wireless support services and bitlocker support.  WinPE, is a stripped down version of WinRE that is more "generic" since it doesn't have the preinstalled system drivers. This can be ideal in some situations where you don't want to have competing drivers causing issues at startup (remember it's basically a Windows OS).  In order to add things like bitlocker support, you have to manually add those packages too.  As each package is added, the size of your resulting media will grow.  Overall, 100MB is not going to make the rescue media much faster (or slower) and doesn't take up a bunch of space.  

Beginner
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Hi Bob, When I plugged the new USB stick into the Win10 Laptop, Windows recognized it and displayed it in the My Computer window. but did not offer a prompt. When ATI Boot Media ran, it also saw the USB and displayed it as a potential media to write to. Media builder complied a 700 MB file size and began to execute the build. It proceeed for about 3 mins and then reported that it could not write to the USB but gave no reason or option. I suspect that the USB was 64GB of exFAT but unallocated.  When I inserted that USB into my Windows 7 machine, it also recognized and display it but it asked if I wanted it formatted. It was only after it did a quick format and left it as exFAT, that the media builder on the Win 10 laptop asked to reformat it. I think ATI media builder has a flaw in its program code.

Bob, thanks for you explanation of the ADK, WinRe, and WinPe and why the different look and size difference.  Clearly the ATI boot builder uses the new environment to build boot media that work. However before I did the installs, the recovery media builder did not function properly.  While installing ATI 2019, I did not expect to play the part of IT professional and spend 4 or 5 days trying to get around the problem.  I also find that Acronis user manuals could use a little refinement but I won't go there right now.

Thanks for your support.

Best regards, 

Murray

 

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If I'm not mistaken the maximum size for a USB flash drive is 32GB. You are using a 64GB drive which will not work.

Beginner
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Thomas, 64Gb is still good but the format from Sandisk was exFAT and boot builder will use 64GB but format must be FAT32. I ok’d it to reformat the USB and it wrote the code to it.

Cheers, Murray

Legend
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Murray, please see KB 58108: Acronis products: using USB sticks with more than 32GB capacity

This is related to a Microsoft restriction on USB boot media, not Acronis.

Beginner
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Steve, thanks. FYI, the original USB stick with the problem was only 16GB. The new USB sticks after installing the ADK and ADK WinPE were 64GB and Builder reformatted it to FAT32 and they function BUT I appreciate the warning. I will try to keep away from 64GB. However, it is getting harder and harder to buy USB sticks which are less than 64GB. I remember 15 years ago when 256MB was latest and greatest but memory technology kept accelerating and the sizes keep going up and up for under $20 a device. 

Cheers, Murray

Legend
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Murray, fully understand about the availability of smaller USB sticks - I am mainly using 16GB ones that I bought as a pack of 10 a few years back, but one way around this is by going the Survival Kit direction.

I haven't used the actual Survival Kit option from with the ATI GUI but done a 'roll my own' to achieve the same result using the MVP Custom ATIPE Builder script.  All that is needed is to create a small 2GB FAT32 partition at the start of a larger USB HDD (or SSD) then give the FAT32 partition a drive letter, after which you can just point the builder at that drive to create the media.  The key benefit of doing this is to have only 1 USB device connected for both booting from and for storing my .tib files for backup or recovery. 

Beginner
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Steve, thanks. You make some good points. I use a good tool called Partition Wizard 11.0 Pro Edition for MiniTool.com and it will do anything to any disk or SSD on the planet. And it will be safe to partition a 64 GB USB stick. It also provides recovery of lost data or partitions. 

I use Acronis to backup the OS drive. Unfortunately my OS drive is roughly 120GB and it won't fit on a 64GB USB. Moreover hard disk is still a more reliable media than USB whose memory cells are trapped charge dependent and slower read/write.

I have enormous amount of data on my data drives especially high res photos and videos. Instead of using Acronis to backup the data drives, I use a program called Synchback by 2BrightSparks. It runs in Right Mirror, Left Mirror, and Sync modes and can be incremental so it only takes 1 minute to sync and additions or deletions made to a 2 TB folder of data to update it. The files are not encrypted (unless you enable it) so the files are stores in conventional format and also accessible on the backup drive. It's very fast, efficient, and safest. The program has a free version and a couple of low cost Pro versions if you wish to do some wild things.

Cheers, Murray

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I have a feeling the 32GB limitation is really more of PC (bios firmware) issue on older machines.  I've been using a Sandisk ultra 128GB flash drive (FAT32) for almost 2 years now without issue.  That said, on some older systems I've tried to use it on, it is not detected as a bootable drive - those were mostly ancient legacy-only systems, where I'm sure the size was the issue.  

Like Steve, I've gotten into the habit of using my portable external USB hard drive (1TB) with a 2GB FAT32 partition at the front for creating rescue media to and then using the rest for various backups and files I need on the go.

There are lots of ways to address this though, but using Minitool or a comparable 3rd party tool, can make the partitioning really easy (just backup the drive first - in case, always best to be safe than sorry, when you repartition a drive).

-------------------

My preferred media though is a portable IT swiss army tool that does it all - and this doesn't require any separate partitions, unless you want to dedicate one specifically for your tools and keep backups or data separate, instead of just using folders.  Here's how I do it...

I start by using Windows 10 media creation tool and selecting to build a 32-bit AND 64-bit Windows 10 installer USB drive.  This is key so you get UEFI boot support for 32-bit and 64-bit WinPE/WinRE (most systems can only boot one type in UEFI mode, so there are times you'll need to have both). 

Then, I create a "Wim" folder on the same drive (call it whatever you want) and drop in various WinPE and/or WinRE boot.wim files in it  that are created with other media builders like Acronis, Minitool, etc.  You'll need to rename them as you see fit since they all have to have different names, but the names can be anything you want. 

I then use EASYBCD to create bootloader entry points for legacy boot and then use BOOTICE by Pauly to create UEFI bootloader entry points for every boot.wim file.  

Basically, this allows me to have all of my important IT tools (WinPE / WinRE anyway) on one portable drive and it's rare that I have to make changes with EASYBCD or BOOTICE anymore since my tools don't really change anymore. Just replace old versions of the existing .wim files, with newer ones, but keep the names the same with copy and paste and you'll never have to update the bootloader entries again.

I.E. I have ATIx64.wim and ATIx86.wim.  When a new major release comes out, I rebuild a new boot.wim and then just paste that into the folder, delete the old version and name boot.wim as appropriate.

Top that off with "portable apps" also added to the drive, and I have a portable IT tool that does everything I could possibly want it to with things like Windows installer/recovery, Acronis, other backup tools, other partition tools, etc. and all with 32-bit and 64-boot options, both UEFI and legacy!  

Take a backup of that drive and restore to any other similarly sized drive and it makes replicating them a piece of cake.  I always keep one in my backpack, another on my keychain and another at home as a spare.  

Beginner
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Thanks, Bob, You are really very well prepared! You should give some feedback to Acronis on how they can be better prepared because 99.99% of users are not IT wizards like you and may have their share of troubles with ATI.

Cheers, Murray

Legend
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Rob, thanks for sharing your approach to creating a multi-boot USB stick, I hadn't used EasyBCD to modify the BCD of a PE USB stick, so have learnt a new trick from you!

Out of further interest, which portable apps do you use that work in the WinPE boot environment? A lot of those I have looked at in the past tend to be able to be run only as a standalone app from the USB stick when this is used with normal Windows rather than PE.

The apps that I have been able to use in WinPE have been those from Piriform (CCleaner, Recuva & Speccy) along with Crystal Disk Info.  MiniTool Partition Wizard will work if you have the fully licensed version but not the free one.

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Steve,

Yeah, apps for vanilla WinPE / WinRE have to be truly portable.  Almost any app that is available in another WinPE or WinRE.wim can be copied and pasted out of them into another one - with the exception for those that have specific licensing requirements in the WinPE themselves (Acronis - regkeys and startup service).  I do have the paid version of Minitool Partition so that I can build rescue media with it - don't trust having to reboot from Windows if I don't have to. Likewise, I have a handful of other paid licenses for other partition and backup products so can create winpe with them.

My other secret is WinPE SE (by the oven.org).  It can build WinPE that basically looks, feels and acts like full blown windows.  It even has support for 32-bit apps in 64-bit WinPE.

For a base WinPE builder, it's awesome and it can even simplify adding some common apps like 7zip, Firefox, etc.

Basically I build the base and then add my own apps to it manually (the ones I need all the time as copied out of their own individual boot.wim files), and run the rest off of portable apps (like speccy, recuva, ccleaner) from the thumb drive.

It works best if you use a base Windows 10 Enterprise .iso which you can get fully functional from MSDN if you have an account. Otherwise, the evaluation .iso works just fine as the base for the WinPE.

Legend
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Thanks Rob for all the information.

Beginner
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Hey guys, I have a similar issue. I am (also) having DELL laptop and Win10. Using either an USB stick or Starting with Acronis Loader, ATI freezes after 30-45 sec, even if I do not select anything in the tool.

Any ideas?

 

Legend
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Georg, sorry but a lot more information would be needed to understand your situation?

The original poster for this topic looks to have resolved the problems he was seeing by creating the Advanced Windows PE version of the ATI 2019 Rescue Media that uses the Windows 10 ADK to provide the PE files.

Your reference to Acronis Loader suggests you have the Acronis Startup Recovery Manager (ASRM) feature installed (which gives a F11 key prompt on boot) and which uses the older Linux based Acronis rescue boot environment?

How have you created your Acronis Rescue USB stick, what options did you take, and how are you booting this stick in terms of the BIOS mode (Legacy or UEFI)?
What BIOS mode does your Windows 10 OS use for booting?

Note: you need to identify what BIOS mode is used by your Windows 10 OS - issuing msinfo32 in Windows will show this in the output report.  You must boot the Acronis Rescue media using the same BIOS mode in order for the recovery to be successful.

See KB 59877: Acronis True Image: how to distinguish between UEFI and Legacy BIOS boot modes of Acronis Bootable Media - with reference to the above note.

Beginner
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Hi Steve,

thanks for you answer.

1) it is an older BIOS, so I do not have to differentiate between UEFI / Legacy

2) yes, I tried it with ASRM and as well with an USB stick using A. Universal Restore. This works fine with other PCs but not with this one

Beginner
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Georg,  here is my analysis and solution.

- I have not had a single problem on another PC I have, only on the Dell.

- The Dell used ATI 2013 for the last few years and did not have a problem until 2013 was uninstalled and replaced with ATI 2019.

- In addition to the standard ATI Boot Media Builder I prepared one using the Universal Recovery Builder. It boots up and offers me the choice to start Univ Recovery or ATI. I choose ATI and it freezes by 1.5 mins once it comes up and displays the menus. The total  file size on the USB boot media is only 338 MB which is a red flag to me because it should be approx 600 - 700 MB.   I have done machine code programming on microprocessor ICs back in the 1980's. My assessment of the current problem is that the Booted ATI runs until it jumps to a subroutine that does not exist is is not at the specified memory location and the processor runs off in scrambled mode. The only way to pull is out is a physical reset or non maskable interrupt. 

- My solution was to start the standard ATI Boot builder and select ADVANCED in stead of SIMPLE mode. The builder will present you with two links to Microsoft to download ADK and WinPE installers. The builder will stay in wait mode until you have installed both (just double click when down loaded one at a time). The installation make take about 30 - 45 mins for the two. Once the boot builder detects the completion of the installation, it will proceed to build the the media. That boot media will be rock solid and should run fine. I suggest you give it a try.

Cheers, Murray

Legend
Posts: 59
Comments: 16106

Georg, please try creating a new USB stick using the ATI 2019 Simple method, using a stick that is under 32GB in size and formatted as FAT32.

See KB 61632: Acronis True Image 2019: how to create bootable media

Legend
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The total  file size on the USB boot media is only 338 MB which is a red flag to me because it should be approx 600 - 700 MB. 

Murray, thanks for sharing your update - the small size for the USB media does look incomplete and I too would expect a larger size.  My own USB media comes in at about 1.2GB when created using the MVP Custom ATI PE builder script with the extra features this brings.

Beginner
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@ Steve: the stick has 16GB and it is formatted with FAT32

Forum Hero
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We've seen plenty of users who have an issue with the thumb drive.  It looks and appears to be fine, but is really corrupt partition table).

Often, if you use diskpart and select the USB and then "clean" it (this will wipe out all partitions and data on it), then go into Windows disk management and initialize the disk as a FAT32 disk, it often resolves media build issues. 

Personally, if you have Win10 and can use advanced and make WinRE media, that is usually the easiest/best method.  If your recovery environment is from another OS (Win 7 or something), or if the recovery partition is missing or corrupt, then Win 10ADK can be manually downloaded from Microsoft and installed (although it's fairly large at close to 6GB), but is very useful for building WinPE rescue media - driver support and stability for older and newer systems is so much better than the default Linux rescue media (which is also used by ARSM and ARSM has been known to "blow up machines" in the forums at times because it overwrites the Windows bootloader)

If only Microsoft would allow for the distribution of pre-built WinPE / WinRE, but the licensing requirements states it can only be built on an existing licensed full version of Windows for the owner or supporter of those systems. This is why WinRE builds are so nice - nothing extra to have to download and install and includes your local system drivers... but older OS (like Win 7, still have crappy driver support and lack of native support for PCIE NVME drives and the sort).