Skip to main content

PC Returned From Dell after replacing Processor - Backup Fails to Boot

Thread needs solution
Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

Dell replaced processor and reinstalled factory system.  My backup of only the C: Drive fails with an error 0xc000000f saying that a required device isn't connected or can't be found.  All the drives are installed and connected.  Can this failure be due to the change of processor?

0 Users found this helpful
Legend
Posts: 102
Comments: 22810

#1

Ken, it is very unlikely that the error is caused by the change of processor, especially if the reinstalled factory system OS was working ok.

What type of backup of your C: drive do you have / have you restored?
Is this a Disks & Partitions backup image?

How did you do the recovery of that backup image?

What type of disk drive is installed in your Dell PC & what type of PC is it? (Laptop or Desktop?).

The required device not connected suggests that this may have been a UEFI boot system which has been recovered as a Legacy boot system?

If you are able to look at the partitions in the backup image, check whether it shows an EFI System Partition in the image?  If so, then you need to do the recovery with the Acronis Rescue Media booted in UEFI BIOS boot mode.

See KB 65508: Acronis True Image 2021: how to create bootable media and KB 59877: Acronis True Image: how to distinguish between UEFI and Legacy BIOS boot modes of Acronis Bootable Media

KB 65539: Acronis True Image 2021: How to restore your computer with WinPE-based or WinRE-based media

Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

#2

Steve,

C: Drive is an SSD

Backup created with ATI 2021 as a whole disk differential image

Recovery using media created with MVP builder 1.8.6

Rescue media was booted in UEFI boot mode UEFI: KingstonDT 101 G2 PMAP.

Note that there is no difficulty reinstalling windows from USB iso

Thanks,

Ken

Legend
Posts: 102
Comments: 22810

#3

Ken, is the SSD a SATA 2.5 or 3.5 inch one, or is it a NVMe type SSD?

When you did the recovery using the MVP rescue media, was the SSD shown correctly and did you recover the whole disk with all its partitions?

Have you checked that the Dell BIOS is using 'Windows Boot Manager' as the boot device?

Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

#4

Steve,

SSD is NVMe. ( bc11 nvme sk hynix 512gb) factory installed.  I would have to pop the case to tell you the size if it is important.  

I recovered only the C: Drive.   As the destination, it shows the EFI partition, the NTFS OS partition and three recovery partitions.  I chose the NTFS OS partition.  This is what I expect to see on the C: Drive

And, yes, I have checked that the BIOS is using "windows Boot Manager" as the boot device.  

Thanks,

Ken

Legend
Posts: 102
Comments: 22810

#5
Ken S wrote:

SSD is NVMe. ( bc11 nvme sk hynix 512gb) factory installed.  I would have to pop the case to tell you the size if it is important.  

I recovered only the C: Drive.   As the destination, it shows the EFI partition, the NTFS OS partition and three recovery partitions.  I chose the NTFS OS partition.  This is what I expect to see on the C: Drive

And, yes, I have checked that the BIOS is using "windows Boot Manager" as the boot device. 

Ken, you should be recovering all the original partitions from the disk backup image, not just the C: OS partition.  Each partition has a unique GUID which is used within the BCD entries to tell the PC how to boot into Windows, so leaving the new EFI partition from the factory install would not match with your recovered C: partition.

(NVMe SSDs are PCIe card drives that fit into a short slot on the motherboard and look like memory modules.)

Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

#6

How about Track 0?

Legend
Posts: 102
Comments: 22810

#7

Ken, if you select the top Disk level tick box when doing the Recovery it selects all that is needed which is as described in KB 65539 referenced above.

Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

#8

Thanks,  I will let you know how it works out.  Ken

Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

#9

Steve,

I did as you suggested and chose the full disk option (all partitions and track 0) and unfortunately that failed to boot also.  

I had made some progress is getting back to my configuration manually today starting from a fresh install of the OS on the repaired XPS 8940 so I installed Acronis and made of full disk backup.  Fortunately that was successful and the restore worked so I did not lose today's work.  It also suggests that I am capable of actually correctly doing a full disk backup and restore using ATI on this computer.  

Not sure where to go with this.  It is looking like all of my backups before the Dell Repair job are not useful.  The way I have the XPS 8940 setup my actual data is on a different drive from my OS drive so data is safe.  

I would be happy to entertain any other ideas you may have.

Thanks,

Ken

 

Forum Star
Posts: 53
Comments: 1822

#10

Dell may have changed some BIOS settings. If the SATA mode setting was changed, you would get what you are seeing. I would check how the SATA mode is set now (AHCI or RAID). Then go back to the working Windows system and check Device Manager to see what storage controller is being used.

I would get the driver used by the storage controller. Use this link for instructions to get the driver:

https://www.acronis.com/en-us/blog/posts/power-user-insights-advanced-winpere-driver-injection-acronis-media-builder

Then restore the system you want from a WinPE recovery media. Reboot back into the WinPE recovery media and inject the driver for the storage controller. You will need to know the drive letter WinPE has assigned to the restored Windows partition. Let's assume it is C:. Then at a command window enter the following command:

dism /Image:C: /Add-Driver /Driver:F:\Drivers /recurse

This assumes you stored the storage controller driver in a folder named Drivers and stored it on a data hard drive and that WinPE assigned F: to that drive.

See if the restored system can boot.

 

Forum Member
Posts: 8
Comments: 57

#11

At this point I have invested the effort to rebuild my OS drive starting from a fresh install so I am reluctant to continue the effort to restore it.  I am able to use backups from before the repair to recover individual files and folders and that is sufficient at this point.  I will store Mustang's suggestion for future battles and I thank both Steve Smith and Mustang for the help and expert advice.  

Ken

 

Legend
Posts: 102
Comments: 22810

#12

Ken, going a for new fresh install of Windows can often be beneficial in giving you the best performance without all the clutter that impacts systems after months / years of use.  Having all your data stored on a separate drive is definitely good practise - one that I use myself too, as it keeps recovery to a simpler operation, including needing to reinstall the OS.

Hopefully you won't need to repeat this exercise at any time in the future!