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Entire PC Back Up Don't Match Data Size

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Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 1

Hey there,..

Newbie here in backing up and all and have a question regarding what i see after I did Entire PC back up with Acronis Survival Kit.

First, when calculating data size from disks backed up, I am mising 50GB of data
Second, when i just compare the statistics about Pictures, it says backed up 13.4GB yet I have 80GB of them.

Am i missing something trying to back up everything? I mean entire PC should mean exactly that, everything.

Or software is compressing things and reports lower size of data that can be recovered?

Thanks

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Legend
Posts: 98
Comments: 21008

#1

Goran, welcome to these public User Forums.

Acronis has certain exclusions which are applied when making backups and others which are set by Microsoft for when the VSS snapshot feature is used.  These exclusions can account for large sizes of data such as the pagefile.sys, hiberfil.sys, swapfile.sys, System Volume Information folders...

The size of Pictures is based on a range of file types stored on local drives selected for the backup but does not include such files that you may have in Cloud folder locations such as for OneDrive if using their On Demand feature.

Forum Hero
Posts: 69
Comments: 8317

#2

Am i missing something trying to back up everything? I mean entire PC should mean exactly that, everything.

Or software is compressing things and reports lower size of data that can be recovered?

Entire PC is meant to back up all internal drives - it won't backup external drives (just FYI).  Personally, I prefer to backup each hard disk separately using the disk/partition backup and picking one physical disk per backup if I need to backup the entire thing.  That way, I always know know exactly what disk is on each backup and what is supposed to be on it (no guessing).  The exclusions still apply - it will automatically skip things like trash, temp, system restore points, hibernation file, etc. so there will be a size difference.  And yes, compression will save space so the output file will never match the original drive size.  Videos and pictures are already compressed.  You won't get much compression directly on those types of files, but you will get good compression on the OS, user data, applications, etc.

In 2019 and earlier, it was easy to "mount" the backup as a volume (drive letter) and then use something like treesize free to compare the content of the backup to the original drive so you could pinpoint the file size differences at the folder levels.  2020 is still missing the mount option, although we're supposed to be getting back at some point.  

In the meantime, you may want to recover your backup to a different "test" drive and compare it to the original, just to be sure.