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recover from my D: or F is very slow ..

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Beginner
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hello to Support 

when i try to recover from my D: or F: i get very slow to opening of the recovery file that is sitting on d: or f.

how can i make it fast ??

thanks rokemz.

 

 

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Legend
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Comments: 19877

#1

Roke, welcome to these public User Forums.

There are various factors that can influence the performance of any recovery operation:

  • The USB type used for the connection to the backup drive, i.e. USB 3.1 is much faster than USB 2.0.  This assumes both the drive and USB port both support the same standard (USB 3.x) otherwise the lowest common standard is used.
  • The location of the USB port on the computer, where ports connected directly to the PC motherboard are normally better than those connected by internal cables within the PC case.
  • The power drain for the USB backup drive and whether the PC port can supply this - this is where having a drive with its own independent power source or connecting via a powered USB 3.1 hub can help.
  • The number of backup images stored on the backup drive(s).  ATI will scan for such files when populating the list of files available for recovery, so the more files present on multiple drives will give a slower performance.  Disconnecting unrelated drives can help.
Beginner
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Comments: 5

#2

Hello to Steve Smith

Drive D is an internal physical drive that is connected to a SATA cable directly to the board and is still very significantly slow.

You say that to unplug the F drive (that is connect with a USB) and try ?

in the past it wasn't like that !

In my opinion, it is something of software and not hardware.

Perhaps in terms of file compression there is a problem ?

i attached below a picture for you. 

thanks Rokemz .

 

 

Attachment Size
530630-179781.JPG 15.41 KB
Legend
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#3

Unfortunately SATA cables can go bad, even though it would seem impossible as they are only used internally with the case.

Try reseating both ends of the 2 SATA cables going to your internal drive(s) to see if that makes any difference?  One cable comes from the power supply so can only be reseated at the drive end, the second data cable comes from the motherboard SATA ports to the drive(s).

I have replaced a few SATA cables recently on machines giving strange intermittent problems where the cables 'look' fine but the problems went away when using new cables!

Another factor can be the power supply if any of the voltages being supplied are dropping lower than their expected values.  This can be the case where new hardware components have been added which demand more power than the supply is rated to deliver, or simply a factor of the age of the supply.

Amazon sell fairly simple power supply test devices which can show if the correct / expected voltages are being supplied.

HDD drives themselves are relatively slow in comparison to modern SSD drive and can suffer from mechanical issues, but also whether they are all on the same SATA controller bus can limit performance, depending on how many SATA controllers are present.

Beginner
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#4

Hello to Steve Smith

ok i wiil try what you suggested and i will back to you with answer .

thanks allot for your time i appreciate the help ..

 

thanks again  Rokemz 

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#5

There are several disk benchmark programs that can help indicate disk transfer rate problems.  (I use ATTO Disk Benchmark.)  I have no idea if the numbers provided are accurate, but they can at least indicate relative speed.  Your HDDs  will, of course, be slower than your SSD.

I have a 3TB WD My Book connected by USB 3.0 and get transfer rates (both read and write) of around 135MB/s for blocks longer than 16KB (according to ATTO).  That disk is attached to a PC running ATI 2019 which reports about 95MB/s to it. 

I don't have a My Book on any computer running ATI 2020, but I'll try with a WD 3TB Passport and update this posting with the results.

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#6

I misread the description of the problem.  This relates to recovery, not backup.

Were you trying to recover from ATI running under Windows,  from an ATI recovery medium, or by browsing a backup file using File Explorer?  If you were using an ATI recovery medium, which kind did you create?

Browsing a backup using File Explorer can be very slow depending, I think, on the size and depth of the directories.

 

Beginner
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#7

1.Were you trying to recover from ATI running under Windows ? yes 

2.from an ATI recovery medium, or by browsing a backup file using File Explorer?

browsing a backup file 

it's slow like he'll , 2.47.45 MIN  to open one folder The problem that the recovery file in one "case" with a lots of folders in it ,so it takes forever to get to the file you need.

2. after i finely successes to get the file from the recovery and i want to copy it to desktop it's take a lot of time until i get the transfer window of win 10 and then it's start the copy to the desktop with Ok speed.

p.s I replaced all the sata cables with no changed It's still very slow.

 

I'd love more solutions from the team .

thanks' rokemz.

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#8
Roke Mz wrote:

1.Were you trying to recover from ATI running under Windows ? yes 

2.from an ATI recovery medium, or by browsing a backup file using File Explorer?

browsing a backup file 

Actually, that was 3 options, not 2.  I interpret your response as

  1. Were you trying to recover from ATI running under Windows ? no
  2.  from an ATI recovery medium? no
  3. by browsing a backup file using File Explorer? yes

The important difference is that you are not using the ATI Recovery feature when you browse a backup file.   (File Explorer is obviously invoking an ATI function to read the backup, but it isn't doing a recovery.)

 

Roke Mz wrote:

it's slow like he'll , 2.47.45 MIN  to open one folder The problem that the recovery file in one "case" with a lots of folders in it ,so it takes forever to get to the file you need.

...

I'd love more solutions from you

I would also love a solution because, as you've mentioned, this process can be very slow.  If you want to get files from multiple directories you might be better off doing an actual Recovery of your backup to an external drive and then accessing the recovered directories and files without involving ATI at all.

I have no other suggestions.  Maybe someone else has some.

By the way, I have not seen very many people complain about this on the forum so perhaps there is something situational that causes a performance problem in just a few environments.  If so, my 4 computers seem to share that problematic environment.

Beginner
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#9

hello to Patrick O'Keefe

  1. Were you trying to recover from ATI running under Windows ? can you explain what is mean ecover from ATI running under Windows ?
  2.  from an ATI recovery medium? can you explain what is mean ATI recovery medium ?
  3. by browsing a backup file using File Explorer? can you explain what is mean browsing a backup file using File Explorer ?

thanks rokemz.

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#10
  1. When displaying a backup task in the ATI GUI there is a Recovery tab.  Click on it and you will enter the Recovery function that will allow you to recover your backed up data.
     
  2. In the Tools section of the ATI GUI there is a Rescue Media Builder function that allows you to create a bootable recovery medium - a USB thumb drive or DVD.  There is also an excellent recovery tool that you can build by downloading the builder by clicking on the  "MVP User Tools and Tutorials" link in the right hand pane if this forum page.
     
    After building the recovery medium you boot from it and you will get a stand-alone ATI backup and recovery environment that is a bit different from the one available through the regular Windows ATI GUI.  And you are not running under the system that was backed up so you can recovery that backed up system without disrupting your recovery operating system.
     
  3. When running in Windows, you can open the Windows File Explorer, browse to wherever you have your .tib or .tibx backup files.  If you open one of those files, File Explorer will use a chunk of Acronis code to open the backup file and let File Explorer traverse the backed up directories until you find the backed up file you want.  (For some of us, this is a very slow process.)
Beginner
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Comments: 5

#11

HI Patrick O'Keefe

thanks for replying now i understand what you mean !

  1. Were you trying to recover from ATI running under Windows ? no
  2.  from an ATI recovery medium? no
  3. by browsing a backup file using File Explorer? yes

thanks rokemz