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ATI 2021 (most recent vers) failed to create image

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Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 8

Hello,

First off - full disclosure - I am not a newbie - I am a level 1 (but currently in computer school to upgrade my skills) help desk analyst in the corporate sector with 25 years experience.  That being said, here's the situation.

Recently I tried to create an emergency (just in case there actually was an emergency - there actually is no emergency) system disk image of my OS SSD 1TB to be on my original 640GB HDD and it failed.  The HDD is plugged in via a 10 plug USB hub whereas the SSD is installed in my laptop which is Win10 Pro.  I have downloaded/installed the error log viewer off the Acronis forum and this is the resulting error log:

3/30/2021 11:49:36 PM: -----
3/30/2021 11:49:36 PM: ATI Demon started. Version: 25.7.1.39184.
3/30/2021 11:49:36 PM: Operation Clone Disk started.
3/30/2021 11:49:36 PM: Operation description: Clone Disk 1. Clearing disk Hard disk: 6
2. Clearing disk Hard disk: 6
3. Hard disk: 1 -> 6 Drive letter: F: File system: NTFS Volume label: SYSTEM Size: 199 MB
4. Hard disk: 1 -> 6 Drive letter: C: File system: NTFS Volume label: OS Size: 930.6 GB -> 595.3 GB
5. Hard disk: 1 -> 6 Drive letter: - Type: 0x27 (Windows RE Hidden, PQ, MirOS) File system: NTFS Volume label: Size: 694 MB -> 696 MB
6. Copying MBR Hard disk: 1 -> 6
.
3/30/2021 11:55:09 PM: Error 0xa0001: Failed to prepare operations. Error code: 3 'Internal error: script is inconsistent'
3/30/2021 11:55:09 PM: Error 0x13c0005: Operation has completed with errors.

Start: 3/30/2021 11:49:36 PM
Stop: 3/30/2021 11:55:09 PM
Total Time: 00:05:33

 

Can someone please explain why it failed and what I need to do so that I can create a successful image of my OS disk?  I made certain that capacity was not an issue because I did receive an initial notification that I had too much from my source (SSD) to be b/u to my HDD so I went through and eliminated enough that wasn't mandatory for an emergency image to have.  I do routine backups and also keep a second physical 1TB HDD installed inside the laptop (my laptop has 2 bays) to segregate my data.

I really would like to be able to create images routinely of my OS disk and need to know what I did wrong.  I am wondering if it has anything to do with the fact that the target disk is not installed in the computer and is instead connected via USB.  I would like to at all costs NOT have to keep opening the laptop (I looked up the old receipts and as of this year it is officially 10 years old having been purchased in 2011 but is still a rock star because I have upgraded components repeatedly over the years to its current config which now has it at its max config - hopefully will be replacing it before the end of the year) and swapping out the data drive just to perform an image.

I have recently purchased a 10TB SeaGate external USB desktop drive.  I also own an OLD (and I mean old - purchased before laptop) 3TB SeaGate USB Desktop Drive that was pretty full and was the target of all of my BU over the years.  I have successfully moved the old BU from that drive to the new 10TB using the ATI program to move those files (did not drag and drop).  I thought I could just create the image on that drive but realized too late that I needed to create a separate partition FIRST for the OS drive image before performing the move of the BU off the 3TB.  I learned this because when I went to create the OS image on the 10TB it told me it had to format the drive to which I cursed like a truck driver and smacked myself on my head and said "DUH". 

This now leaves me with 2 questions.

1)  Can I create a separate partition on the 10TB and use that for image creation of the OS?

2)  If the original error had anything to do with the fact that the target drive for the image creation was not a physically installed drive but rather was connected via USB then wouldn't that negate using a segregated partition on the 10TB USB as the target also?  That would make little sense for people that want to routinely create emergency BU images of their OS disk because who wants to keep opening machines and physically swapping out drives to do so?

 

All information greatly appreciated.

 

Sincerely,

Alisa

 

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Legend
Posts: 105
Comments: 24719

Alisa, not sure why this topic about ATI 2021 is in the forum for older / obsolete products??

You log shows you doing a Clone, not creating a backup image, hence some of the further issues you have described such as the clone wanting to format the target drive.

I would recommend that you read the document linked in my signature that describes the difference between a clone and a backup.

KB 65520: Acronis True Image 2021: how to back up files or disks

KB 65468: Acronis True Image 2021: how to back up entire computer

Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 8

Hello,

I did various searches through Google using the search terms of Acronis True Image 2021 along with Error 0xa0001and one of the searches came up with that error but for the obsolete version.  I then clicked on the "create new topic" and it did what I did not expect it to do, that being creating the new topic in the obsolete version category unfortunately.

I am aware of the differences between back ups and image creation/cloning.  I haven't done a cloning/image creation in a while for numerous reasons that are irrelevant to this discussion which is why I am attempting and wanting to create the clone at this time.

There is an interesting fact to note that comes based upon my current reading of the KB articles.  I purchased the 1TB SSD last year and was able to successfully clone my old/original 640GB HDD to the SSD without the SSD installed, as in original HDD still installed in the laptop and the SSD connected via a short USB cable at that time plugged directly into one of the USB ports on the laptop.  I do not understand the whole information saying that the target drive as opposed to the source drive needs to be physically installed.  Can you please elaborate on that?  To me it makes no sense to me logically because Acronis has to be installed on the source drive which needs to be the drive that is booted from, so call me confused on this point.

I am continuing my reading but still need those questions answered to help me to understand/make sense of things.

 

Thank you,

Alisa

Legend
Posts: 105
Comments: 24719

Please see KB 56634: Acronis True Image: how to clone a disk - and review the step by step guide given there.

Note: the first section of the above KB document directs laptop users to KB 2931: How to clone a laptop hard drive - and has the following paragraph:

It is recommended to put the new drive in the laptop first, and connect the old drive via USB. Otherwise you will may not be able to boot from the new cloned drive, as Acronis True Image will apply a bootability fix to the new disk and adjust the boot settings of the target drive to boot from USB. If the new disk is inside the laptop, the boot settings will be automatically adjusted to boot from internal disk. As such, hard disk bays cannot be used for target disks. For example, if you have a target hard disk (i.e. the new disk to which you clone, and from which you intend to boot the machine) in a bay, and not physically inside the laptop, the target hard disk will be unbootable after the cloning.

Note: the expectation when doing the above is that the laptop will be booted from Acronis Rescue Media to perform the clone, not by installing both Windows & the ATI app in the OS.

Beginner
Posts: 3
Comments: 8

This piece of information from your reply:

Note: the expectation when doing the above is that the laptop will be booted from Acronis Rescue Media to perform the clone, not by installing both Windows & the ATI app in the OS.

Is the piece of information that I needed to understand about the machine booting situation.  I did not take into consideration that Acronis would be booting from a recovery media and then "seeing" that there is a source disk with a bootable OS on it and also an empty disk that would be the target receiving the clone of the source disk.

It is still interesting to note that when I performed my initial cloning of my old 640GB HDD to my new 1TB SSD that the cloning process worked successfully create the SSD as a successfully booting OS disk even though it was NOT installed in my laptop and was only connected through USB.

 

How much capacity is needed to create rescue media?  I have several various sized flash drives that I can use.

 

Alisa

Legend
Posts: 105
Comments: 24719

Alisa, in principle it should be possible to clone from an internal to an external disk and this may work for some users but is not guaranteed.  The reason for this is that additional hardware is involved in attaching the new drive externally, this may cause the drive to be connected by a completely disk controller / adapter than is used when the drive is installed internally, and also for additional device drivers to be installed to accommodate the disk controller found.

For rescue media, you need either a DVD or else a 2GB USB flash drive minimum (maximum should be under 32GB ideally).  I typically have used 16GB USB sticks.