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Cloned from 2x500GB JBOD in machine to 2TB single HDD. No boot.

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Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Greetings experts. I cloned from a system using 2 500GB HDDs in RAID 0 (Machine recognizes as one 1TB drive?) to a new single 2TB HDD using a USB enclosure. It appeared to have cloned successfully. However, when I installed the 2TB cloned HDD into the same machine that had the 2x500GB HDDs, it would not boot. Error said that something was missing. I can't remember what, just that it wouldn't boot. It also got so lost that I had to unplug the dang power cord to shut the machine down, power button was of no use. Not good, but no choice.

Am I attempting the impossible by going from JBOD(?) to one large HDD in expecting the clone to be a clone that is as bootable as the source disk(s)? Windows 7 OS. Acronis TI 2011 for cloning operation and attempted boot therefrom. Help? Thanks for any help, suggestions, good thoughts, etc.

Oh, and does anyone know of a keyboard command that will shut down Windows 7 OS without a visible interface? Thanks. Cheers.

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Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, I have never played with any JBOD scenarios nor used RAID with the same so my comments are based purely on other experience etc.

First, I would not recommend using cloning for this migration as Acronis has a habit of looking at the hardware used for the clone target and making it dependent on the same!

The way I would suggest trying is to make a full Disk & Partitions backup of your working Win 7 OS with the JBOD configuration - store this on an external storage drive.

Next, swap out the JBOD drives and replace by the new drive, then boot the PC using the Acronis bootable rescue media and check that you are able to 'see' the new drive so that it could be selected as the target for doing a recovery.

If all looks good, then restore the JBOD backup image to the new drive, so that only the hardware components that are normally used by Windows 7 are present.

One further comment: check what BIOS boot mode is used by Windows 7 with the original JBOD configuration, i.e. is this a Legacy / MBR system, or is it a UEFI / GPT system?  This is important as the recovery using the Acronis media needs to be done with that media booted using the same BIOS mode.

You can confirm the BIOS boot mode by running the command: msinfo32 in Windows - this will open a report and you should see BIOS mode in the right panel part way down.  If it doesn't say UEFI, then you will have a Legacy system.

KB 59877: Acronis True Image: how to distinguish between UEFI and Legacy BIOS boot modes of Acronis Bootable Media

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Thanks, Steve. No "UEFI" shows for the BIOS. I'm using a Dell XPS from around 2011, with BIOS of the same year, so I guess I shouldn't be surprised. I'll try to follow your detailed instructions to see if it works. I did make a backup of the full disk and partitions a month or so back. I'll have to verify that I validated it before proceeding. Better yet, I probably should make a new one, and validate, just before attempting the recovery to the new HDD.

FWIW, brand-wise, the HDD's are all WD. If I had it to do over again I'd have bought 2 1 TB drives and used a RAID 1 setup to get the redundancy. Oh well, live and learn, even if it's a little late. Many thanks again for your time and expertise. Cheers.

(Edit) Oh, and BTW, would you, Steve, suggest that I reformat the 2TB HDD or maybe do the drive cleanser on it so it goes into the machine as a blank slate? It now has the cloned image on it whether I can boot from/to it or not. Thanks.

 

 

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, there shouldn't be any need to reformat the 2TB HDD other than to ensure a clean new restore / start.  Acronis will wipe the drive as one of the first steps after you say to proceed so that it can recreate the partition structure from the backup image.  You can do this using the Tools > Add new disk option of the Acronis rescue media when the new drive is installed and before starting the restore.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Thanks, Steve ! I'll try what you suggest. Cheers.

 

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, one further thought here -  check your BIOS boot options before making any changes to the current working system, then check them again after the drive change and recovery - you need to see the new HDD as the boot option to be able to boot into Win 7 on a Legacy boot PC.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Well, I'm sunk. The only thing that seemed to work was adding the new disk. It appears to have successfully erased the cloned HDD. I had to throw up my hands, as it just wasn't making a lot of sense to me as I tried to follow what I needed to do. The end result is that again I couldn't find a way to shut down my computer. I found the "Shut down my computer" icon at the lower left of the home screen for Acronis but to no avail. It accomplished nothing. Eventually I had to uplug the power from the back of the unit, which I hated doing. It's the second time in two days I've had to do this as I attempt to do the prudent thing and backup and replace an old HDD before it failed.

I then put my the original HDD into position and plugged the computer in, pressed the power button, and nothing happens. Maybe it's a hardware issue with the power switch? I don't know, but she is dead as a doornail right now. I'm gaining a great understanding as to why people don't backup their computers. This hasn't worked out very well.

Thanks for all of your help, Steve. But I think I'm going to have to try some different software to do my backups, once I get my computer fixed, or replaced. Macrium has been suggested but I wanted to give the Acronis that I bought years ago another go, as it was well reputed at the time. I wish I was a happier camper right now.

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, sorry to read of further issues.  If the PC is not turning on at all, then the power supply would be the first suspect for me.  One way of testing this is to reduce the PC to a minimal configuration by unplugging any drives, removing any PCI cards etc, then test to see if you either get to the BIOS panels / initial bootstrap load from firmware, or hear any error beeps / see the CPU fan spinning etc.

If you still don't get any indication of life, then either the motherboard has died or the power supply.  Try removing any memory modules in case one is shorting the power supply?  Powering on with no memory should at least give a warning beep from the internal speaker.

I had a scenario recently with a very old PC where I replaced an old Maxtor IDE drive with a larger drive and the PC wouldn't turn on (even after putting everything back as it was!).  That was a failed power supply - fortunately I keep some spares around so was back working after replacing the old one.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Thanks, Steve. I just replaced the power supply in the "mule" that I intended to use for validating backups, etc. Now my main machine might be in need of one. Crud. I'll try the steps you mentioned. Truth be told, the switch did seem a little wonky lately. I mean it didn't work to shut it down the other day, and didn't work today. In addition, there's an orange LED lit up on the motherboard near the DDR3 memory. Maybe that will mean something to a Dell person? Thanks again. Cheers.