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Cloning 500gb to 1TB (ssd) ---- is Proportional best

Thread needs solution
KH
Beginner
Posts: 4
Comments: 13

I'm cloning 500gb to 1TB (ssd), using the Acronis Boot CD. 

Of course I want the added space of the new (source) 1TB ssd. But I'm not sure which clone method to use. Acronis automatically selects  Proportional . Not sure if this is correct.

During a prev. clone (40GB to 128GB ssd), I ended up with a "40GB" ssd clone. Not sure what happened! I wasn't happy!!

Please help me select option that allows me to fully utilize the new, larger drive.

Thx!

1 Users found this helpful
Legend
Posts: 99
Comments: 21295

#1

KH, I would recommend the following steps:

  1. Make a full disk backup of your source 500GB drive (your safety net!)
     
  2. Do the clone to the new 1TB SSD drive using the default proportional option.
    Note: if this is a laptop drive, then install the 1TB SSD internally for the Clone with the 500GB drive connected externally.
     
  3. Confirm that the clone is successful.  Check the Logs while still in the rescue media environment before exiting.
     
  4. Boot from the new SSD and check in Windows Disk Management to see if the full 1TB size is being used or not?
    If not, then download a copy of the free MiniTool Partition Wizard software and use this to move any partitions which are after the main C: partition and before the unallocated space, to the end of the drive space, then resize the C: partition to use the unallocated space.
     
  5. Once all changes are done, repeat step 1.

Please see KB 56634: Acronis True Image: how to clone a disk - and review the step by step guide given there.

Note: the first section of the above KB document directs laptop users to KB 2931: How to clone a laptop hard drive - and has the following paragraph:

It is recommended to put the new drive in the laptop first, and connect the old drive via USB. Otherwise you will may not be able to boot from the new cloned drive, as Acronis True Image will apply a bootability fix to the new disk and adjust the boot settings of the target drive to boot from USB. If the new disk is inside the laptop, the boot settings will be automatically adjusted to boot from internal disk. As such, hard disk bays cannot be used for target disks. For example, if you have a target hard disk (i.e. the new disk to which you clone, and from which you intend to boot the machine) in a bay, and not physically inside the laptop, the target hard disk will be unbootable after the cloning.

KB 59877: Acronis True Image: how to distinguish between UEFI and Legacy BIOS boot modes of Acronis Bootable Media

KH
Beginner
Posts: 4
Comments: 13

#2

Actually, I went ahead and cloned Prop., prior to reading your reply. It worked. I did it (again) on my separate desktop PC right afterward ... worked again!

Not sure about that EXTRA & confusing step ATI suggests of removing your orig source drive and putting that on an external USB. After a clone is completed, I want to make sure the orig. is okay, so I boot up with it as normal. Only if that went okay (always has in my cases), then I put in the new clone. 

Back to that old XP 40GB laptop from my post ... I think I must have done an "AS IS" clone (not prop.).

Now, I have a bunch of UN-ALLOCATED space on that 128GB drive. Any easy way to use it? Say, a safe partition method?

Legend
Posts: 99
Comments: 21295

#3

Not sure about that EXTRA & confusing step ATI suggests of removing your orig source drive and putting that on an external USB. After a clone is completed, I want to make sure the orig. is okay, so I boot up with it as normal. Only if that went okay (always has in my cases), then I put in the new clone. 

The reason for the advice to put the new drive in place of the original one in laptops is simply that many adapters used to attach drives can introduce new hardware / controllers which then can cause the cloned drive to be unbootable when moved internally.  Unfortunately this happens all too often for some users, while others, like yourself, are not affected.

Now, I have a bunch of UN-ALLOCATED space on that 128GB drive. Any easy way to use it? Say, a safe partition method?

See my earlier post; step 4.

Boot from the new SSD and check in Windows Disk Management to see if the full 1TB size is being used or not?
If not, then download a copy of the free MiniTool Partition Wizard software and use this to move any partitions which are after the main C: partition and before the unallocated space, to the end of the drive space, then resize the C: partition to use the unallocated space.