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Compression Level

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I have been creating a full backup every month using ATI 2009. I have not changed the default compression level because it would save time and space on the external drive. After thinking about it, I think I can only restore my data files by doing a complete restore using Acronis. If I should lose a single word file, and want to restore it, it would be a problem to recover this one file. My question is this: If I disabled compression, would I be able to go the the backup Archive on the external drive, copy the one file I want to restore, and past it back to my C drive to recover this one file? If that works, would I have problems having some Archives compressed, and some not compressed? Is the compression level recorded in each Archive record so Acronis will know how to handle each restore? I sure would like to have a correct answer on this one. I don't want to just try things not knowing if I will lose some of the compressed backups I now have. Thanks for your interest.  Charles Ranheim

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mvp

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 If you can either Mount or Explore your tib image, you will be able to drag and drop a word document from the image file to the PC.

Compression will only make a difference to the size of your image file.

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Are you saying I can copy and paste a word file from a compressed Archive on an external drive, and it will be de-compressed when I place it on my C drive? I thought I would have to rely on Acronis to to the de-compression.  If it works, who did the de-compression?   If Acrinos did not do it, can I attach the external drive containing the compressed files to the USB port on another PC without Acronis, and read the compressed file? That sure would be interesting. I must be missing something Charles Ranheim

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Acronis is doing the decompression. It's Acronis's driver(s) that's allowing the Mount or Explore function to take place. When such driver detects a file copy from the mounted / explored tib file to the "normal" file system, it decompresses / restores the selected file(s) to the target drive as a copy (and the tib file contents will remain intact). Thus, you can't mount / explore a tib unless acronis is installed on the PC.

Doug

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I tried looking at a word file created by Acronis that was on my external HD connected to a USB port. Acronis was not running at the time. I just went to My Computer, did an explore of the External HD,  and selected one of the .tib files. I then "explored" the file chain down to a word file. I could click on it, and it would open correctly by my word program. I then did a copy from the external HD and pasted the word file in a temp file on my C drive. Again, I could just click on the word file, and it opened correctly. At least I know Acronis does not have to be running for this copy and past to work. I suppose it is possible the Acronis Drivers were available to do the decompression work even though the program was not running. Now I am beginning to wonder if the file was ever compressed. I never selected a compression level, but read compression takes place by default. What do you think about this?  Charles Ranheim

bin
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Selecting normal means TI will compress at its 'normal' level. It doesn't mean it won't use compression. Selecting a higher level just takes longer.

Acronis certainly is running. You will see three Acronis programs in your startup.

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Sparkymachine: You were correct in saying there are three TrueImage programs in my Startup. I also looked at the Online Acronis Manual about selecting the compression options (Sec 5.3.6). The first option is "None", which says to use this option if you do not want compression to take place. My manual shows "High" selected, which may be the default setting. As I said before, I never looked at my compression settings. Do you think I can have a mixed set of Archives at different compression settings? If so, how does Acronis know what decompression level to use? Is it in some header information within each Archive? I wish I knew more about Acronis. So far, I have only done one restore when I had to replace my C drive due to intermittent sector read errors during backups. Thank goodness, that worked OK. Now, the thing I fear most, is having to update my build level because of the problems not being able to delete all of the previous level code. That's another long story. Thanks for your interest,  Charles Ranheim

bin
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Yes Charles the compression info will be in the tib file so you don''t have to worry about it. There is no reason I can think of not to be able to alter the compression for different archives - I use the high level pretty much always because it doesn't slow things down too much and has a decent percentage rate of compression. The highest level just isn't worth it (not for me anyhow).

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Don't try to look at the file directly.  In TI, under Backup and Restore, Select 'Mount Image'.  That gives you access to the individual files in an Explorer window.

This was already said above, but perhaps not understood?

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cnmoore: In my post #4. I described how I was able to display and copy a Word file without starting Acronis. I just went directly to the external HD on the USB port. highlighted the .tib file I wanted to browse, and followed the chain to the Word file I wanted to work with. I was surprised it worked, but apparently, there are some Acronis program parts running from Startup that handled the decompression. Thanks for your comments.  Charles Ranheim