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[Solved] Stop 0xC0000135 The program can't start because %hs is missing from your computer

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Beginner
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I consider this a BUG! I just solved this Windows crash problem. I'm posting to help anyone who finds this (and I HOPE Acronis will fix this)

The problem: Acronis Startup Recovery Manager (ASRM) assumes Acronis TI is installed in a bootable partition. But not necessarily true for a multi-boot machine! If ASRM is activated and you boot into a partition that doesn't have Acronis TI installed, Windows will crash during the Windows start flash screen!!

My symptoms: I have a dual boot machine: XP and Windows 7.

I only installed Acronis TI in XP. Once I activated ASRM, any attempt to boot into my Win 7 partition gave me a blue screen crash!

I booted back to XP and deactived ASRM. Now I was able to boot into Win 7 and install Acronis TI under Win 7 as well. Once that was done i could activate ASRM and boot into either partition.

To Acronis engineers: When ASRM is activated, it should be able to detect a multi-boot Windows machine and WARN the user that TI must installed in each Windows bootable partition!!

p.s. This problem was compounded by support who told me I couldn't install and activate TI under more then one partition! Obviously, that's false.

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Forum Hero
Posts: 613
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Do you know if this has happened with 2013 but was OK in 2012?

What build are you using?

I have to say, that apart from some specific uses, it is better to use either the recovery CD or a USB stick for booting into the recovery environment.

Beginner
Posts: 7
Comments: 8

I agree... to a point.

ASRM is not guaranteed to work (as in my case, where there is boot/start-up corruption). If ASRM doesn't work then one must go find their recovery CD or flash drive. But still, I think you would agree, that the source of the boot/start-up corruption shouldn't be Acronis True Image itself?!

My guess is that activating ASRM adds an Acronis service or driver to the Windows start on each Windows partition. But if Acronis isn't installed when Win starts (so the file is not found) Windows blue screen crashes!

IMHO This is clearly a bug. At minimum I believe when ASRM is activated and it detects a multi-boot machine, at minimum, it presents the user a pop-up warning that Acronis should be installed under each Win partiton.

I am running TI 2013 build 6514. I have a Dell Optiplex running Win XP SP3 and Win 7 SP1, both 32-bit.

I upgraded from TI 2010. TI 2010 used to be installed under both partitions. When I upgraded to 2013, i only upgraded the XP partition and the problem started. I emailed support who told me acronis TI will only activate one copy per machine (not per partition).

So I booted back to XP and deactived ASRM. Then booted to Win 7 and uninstalled TI 2010 from Win 7 as well. The problem continued till it dawned on me what might be occurring and why. So I installed TI 2013 under Win 7 and proved I was right. Now, Acronis TI (and ASRM) behaves as it should

Forum Hero
Posts: 613
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What boot manger do you use, the XP or W7 one? I wonder if activating the ASRM when in W7 would then allow the ASRM to work (oops just reread your post, I see you've done that).

What is strange is that the ASRM places its' boot code into the boot block of the MBR and causes a redirection, so in theory it ought to boot no matter how many OS partitions you have, unless of course you hide the non booted partitions, that might causethe problem. You certainly can't have two different versions of the ASRM on a disk.

Beginner
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I believe I just proved my theory.

I booted into XP. Activate/Deactive ASRM. I found that as ASRM was Activated/Deactivated it offline edits the SYSTEM hive under Windows 7 each time!

While under XP when i activate/deactivate ASRM I checked the before/after MD5 checksums of each Win 7 registry hives on my W7 partition. The W7 SYSTEM hive a) has different before / after checksum AND I can also see the file modified date/time change!

ASRM is doing offline edits and likely adding/removing Acronis boot time drivers to each SYSTEM hive. So if Windows boots into a partition but can't find the Acronis boot time drivers (e.g. because Acronis 2013 not installed), it crashes

Further, I'll guess there are some new boot drivers in TI 2013 as Windows boot crashed even when TI 2010 was installed.

Forum Star
Posts: 49
Comments: 3750

I do not see the value of the Acronis Startup Recovery Manager. The bootable Rescue Media is available when needed, so I don't see any reason to allow the Acronis Startup Recovery Manager to modify the PC's boot. Acronis Startup Recovery Manager adds complexity and risk without any real value over using the bootable Rescue Media. If activated, it modifies your system drive Master Boot Record (MBR), which can cause problems with multi-boot managers and other low-level disk utilities. I prefer just to use the bootable Rescue Media when needed, either from CD or USB flash drive.

Forum Hero
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The ASRM can be useful in controlled environments, where the disk contents are rarely updated and an emergencgy fall back position is required to get a system back to delivered status.

As an example I used to repair and install medical diagnostic equipment to research labs, one provider of diagnostic machines included a workstation that controlled the machine and directed terrabyte images to a central server alongside a database. These machines came with an ancient version of True Image on them and the out of box system was held in a Secure Zone with the ASRM enabled. This allowed a lab technician if needed to bring the workstation back to how it was when I had initially set it up, no IT department needed, just reload the database afterwards.

Another scenario that i cna think of might be an Internet Cafe or an unemployment office who provide PCs for different users through out the day, going back to a non changing image is simple when using the ASRM.

However, I agree with you Tuttle, not using the ASRM make more sense for the vast majority of people. I assume enough people want to use this function as otherwise Acronis would have removed it by now.

Forum Star
Posts: 49
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Colin, those are interesting examples. You have indeed convinced me that there are specialized situations where the ASRM is useful. :)

But, we're agreed that for almost all users it would be better if they avoided it and instead used the bootable Rescue Media.

Beginner
Posts: 7
Comments: 8

I use ASRM as a convenience (I believe just as it was intended). If my PC doesn't boot i like being able to simply hit F11 without going to find my binders of backup and rescue CDs and the Acronis CD. If F11 doesn't work, then sure I go find the rescue CD.

But, bottom line, as long as ASRM is offered as a feature, it should work. At least to the extent it's not ASRM itself that's corrupting my partition. GAWD! I have 25yrs experience as a system software engineer so was able to figure this out and isolate this bug on my own. But what about the poor, typical user simply using TI 2013 product features prominently placed on the UI?

Plus, support was (mis?)informed as well when they told me TI 2013 could only run on one partition when, that in fact, was the ultimate cause of the problem. IMHO this is clearly a product bug.

IMHO As long as Acronis offers ASRM as a product feature, ASRM shouldn't be the one corrupting a boot partition!

Beginner
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Comments: 1

For those who (like me) came here because they googled for the problem when they got the C0000135 blue screen of death when Disk Director restarted their multi-boot (or previously multi-boot) system, here's how to make your system boot again:

  1. Boot from your Windows installation CD, select the language and click Next
  2. On the next screen click "Repair your computer"
  3. On the next screen, it will search for existing installations. It should find your existing Windows and select it automatically. Take note of where your existing Windows is, there's a chance that the drive letter is different from what you're used to.
  4. Click in a white area in the list so the existing Windows is de-selected, then click Next. (If you don't de-select the existing Windows install, it will try to fix Windows automatically and fail).
  5. You should now see the System Recovery Options menu. Click the Command Prompt item.
  6. In the command prompt window, start regedit
  7. Select one of the top level folders (e.g. HKLM_LOCAL_MACHINE) first, then click File>Load Hive (if you don't select a folder first, the File>Load Hive option is disabled).
  8. Browse to the Windows directory on the hard disk (remember, the drive letters may be all wrong), then open System32\config\SYSTEM. (If you want to make a backup, you can hold the right mouse button and drag the file to the bottom of the list of files and select "Create a Copy" before you open the SYSTEM file. Leave the *.bak files alone, Windows uses these).
  9. Regedit then asks for a key name to use for the new hive. You have to enter a name that doesn't already exist, so type something like "sys" or something, it doesn't really matter. Click OK to close the Load Hive dialog box.
  10. You should now see a new folder "sys" or whatever you named it, under the folder that's selected. "sys" has one or more subfolders "ControlSet001", "ControlSet002", etc. If you have more than one control set, you can either do the following steps on all control sets, or you can use the information under the Select key to figure out which one to modify.
  11. Browse to ControlSetXXX\Control\SessionManager, and double-click on the BootExecute value. Delete the line "autopart.exe" which is the part of Disk Director that normally runs before you see the login screen (you probably don't want to touch any other lines if there are any). Click OK to close the value editor.
  12. Close the registry editor and the command prompt, then click Restart in the System Recovery Options menu. Your system should now start correctly from the normal Windows install.

I've run into this problem at least twice now, and had a heck of a hard time finding information about STOP C0000135. Unfortunately Windows can't automatically repair this simple problem either. I hope this information will be useful to others who are tearing their hair out.

If you still want to change the partitions on your system, you can start Disk Director from a bootable CD that you can create with the software, and it will work fine.

===Jac

Beginner
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Comments: 1

Hi Jac,

we had exactly the same issue right after "reboot". Removing "autopart.exe" helped in our case too!

Thank You ! :)

Thomas