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Western Digital version of True Image issues.

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Beginner
Posts: 2
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Greetings experts,

I'm hoping that someone can assist with some problems I'm having with Acronis. I have TI 2011 on my own PC but have been trying to help a relative who purchased a WD Passport HDD and so am using that WD True Image version. Just before her computer crashed beyond salvage of the OS, I had done a Complete PC backup onto the Passport. I felt pretty good that I'd be able to recover that backup onto a new WD HDD that installed in her machine. It's not going so well.

I have used my 2011 TI version for backup but have never needed to recover that data after a calamity. While the WD version did seem to have an easier interface than 2011, it is proving very difficult in using the backup I did for recovery. I named the backup file using the date it was done, 10_24_21. It was saved as a proper .tibx file on the backup HDD, but I can't seem to get the software to use it to recover to a new internal HDD in the PC. When I go into the interface, it seems to only want to go one way, from the internal HDD to the external HDD. I want it to go the opposite way. Any idea on how to change it? I'm at my wit's end. Many thanks for any suggestions. I'm getting more confused by the minute.

 

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Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, welcome to these public User Forums.

What actual version of ATI was used to create the backup file?

If the file was created by a recent version that uses .tibx files, then only that recent version can be used to recover the image.  Your older ATI 2011 version and all older versions before 2020 have no ability to open or process .tibx files and will consider them to be corrupt.

To be able to do a recovery, you need to first create the Acronis bootable rescue media for the version being used, then boot the PC from that media in the correct BIOS boot mode, then recover the file from the external backup storage drive to the new internal disk drive in the PC.

See KB 65508: Acronis True Image 2021: how to create bootable media and KB 59877: Acronis True Image: how to distinguish between UEFI and Legacy BIOS boot modes of Acronis Bootable Media

KB 65539: Acronis True Image 2021: How to restore your computer with WinPE-based or WinRE-based media

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Hi Steve,

Thanks for responding. The backup was created using the Acronis Western Digital version, which should be very up to date, as I just downloaded it a little over a week back. I did end up trying to get to the backup by booting from an Acronis bootable disk that was made from the same WD version of TI. I had thought I remembered doing a more complete system backup, but apparently that wasn't the case. I was finally able to see the backup file when I searched for it as a data only backup. That said, it seems inconceivable that there would have been 130GB of data on that drive, but that's what the machine tells me. And it does show up as the newer .tibx file.

As I read the user info, after the fact, I saw that it is recommended that one "validates" the backup before putting it away. That's the first I've heard of such things. I've backed up my HDD's using Acronis 2011 a few times but have not had to recover until now. Maybe none of them would of worked? 

The sad news is that once I was able to see the backup, in all of it's 130GB of glory, I got an error message that the file was corrupted, and that maybe I could "mount" the image somehow and recover the non-corrupt data. That's above my pay grade. So maybe the moral of this story, unless I am convinced of a possible happy ending, is trust but verify. I guess I was only halfway there.

I did read one of your other responses on a "corruption" thread. It didn't sound very encouraging for the possibility of recovering from the backup drive. I may stand a better chance of recovering from the crashed HDD? The backup drive is a brand new WD 2 TB Passport external HD. Many thanks. Cheers.

I tried to attach images, but I don't see them. I hope it doesn't show up in too obnoxious of a fashion.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Images of what I'm seeing.

Attachment Size
591916-297683.JPG 193.85 KB
591916-297687.JPG 221.98 KB
Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, first comment:  .TIBX files are only used for Disks & Partitions backups - they are not used for Files & Folders backups, so your backup should be of the former type.

Next comment: It is probable that Acronis used Sector-by-Sector mode when backing up the original drive if this was starting to fail and had bad sectors etc.

One further comment, validation does not guarantee that the content of a backup image file is good, only that the file itself remains unchanged from the point in time when it was created.

If you have ATI installed on another PC, then connect the backup storage drive to that PC and try opening the .TIBX file in Explorer by double-clicking on it to see if it can be opened.
Note: it needs to be the same version of ATI as used to create the backup file or a later version.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Hi Steve,

Thanks again for your learned response. The HDD was near the end, so perhaps Acronis did as you said, via "Sector by Sector", or?

I can install the same Acronis for WD on my PC, as I do have a new Passport that I backed up to, which has my own backup presently being validated via Acronis 2011. I suspect that 2011 won't recognize the .tibx files so I'll have to download the WD version and use it. True?

And I believe that I may have read somewhere that one shouldn't install both programs on the same machine at the same time. Any comments on that? I have the 2011 disk, so I could uninstall the full older version and reinstall after I complete this task. Does that make sense? Many thanks again. Cheers.

Brian W.

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, ATI 2011 is extremely old and definitely won't recognise .tibx files etc, also only one copy of ATI can ever be installed as all use the same program folders.

If you uninstall 2011 then it is unlikely that you will be able to reinstall it, so make a backup of Windows before doing so if you intend to want to go back!  This is especially true if you have Windows 10 as only ATI 2015 and later were ever supported for that OS version.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Thanks, Steve. I'm still running Windows 7, and will as long as possible. It is getting to be a fight though."They" aren't making it any easier.

With my Windows 7 OS I haven't had problems uninstalling and reinstalling ATI. I have done this a few times when it wasn't letting me safely remove memory media because it was doing continuous backup. I now stop that in "Services", IIRC. But thank you for the warning about the possibilities of losing 2011 forever.

Any thoughts on my being able to mount and un-mount an image from the bad hard drive? It looks like ATI 2011 does have a tool for doing that. I'll try to understand what I'm doing first. Thanks again for all of your assistance. Cheers.

BW

 

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, because the image is a .tibx file, you have to use the later ATI 2021 version from WD to be able to work with it.  There isn't a need to actually mount the image as you should be able to browse the contents by just double-clicking on the file in Explorer provided ATI is installed.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

The version I am using is the depicted in the image. The info contained has a copyright date of 2020-2021, so I'm thinking it's pretty up to date. I could be wrong. Maybe the version number tells you something of that? Thanks.

BW

Attachment Size
592038-297762.JPG 232.89 KB
Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, build 39200 is from ATI 2021 for WD.

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Thanks, Steve. I tried to open the backup file using Windows Explorer. I should say I'm still trying. I was able to find the file to double-click. But it seems to have hung up towards the end of the green status-bar. I'm going to give it a few more minutes before I cancel. Unless you think it should be taking more than 1 1/2 hours?

BW

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, if the file is very large then it could take a while to open but wouldn't expect it to take as long as you are indicating!

Having said the above, when dealing with sector-by-sector backup images from failing disks, then I have left them for 12+ hours when either creating or restoring them in the past but can't remember if I had any issues opening the file in Explorer when doing that type of operation?

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

OK, Steve. Thanks. I'll let it ride then. Cheers.

 

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

It finally finished going through much of the 139GB and finding nothing. All that it showed was a blank area under the file. If the green status bar was any indication, it got through the first 90% before hanging up on something it couldn't get around.  It seems like the best bet for recovery is to have an experienced pro see if they can get into the failed HDD and recover something.

I may put the bad HDD in an enclosure and look into it without booting, as just a peripheral HDD for storage of data. Maybe I'll see something useful before I hand it off to the $120 per hour pro.

Thanks for all of your help, Steve. I appreciate your sharing your knowledge.

BW

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Hi again, Steve.

I ended up putting the failed HDD in an external enclosure and used Windows Explorer to open what was on there. I never actually opened an individually listed file. It started out great, showing much of the important backup data was still there, and possibly accessible to someone. But the joy didn't last long, as the screen suddenly got that milky cataract haze over it. When I opened task manager it showed that the program was not responding. I had to shut off the power to the HDD to "eject" it. Would you find some encouragement in the fact that the HDD didn't seem completely melted down? While it doesn't appear recoverable using ATI, it may be recoverable by a specialist? I'd be interested in your thoughts about this. Many thanks again.

Brian W

 

Legend
Posts: 106
Comments: 26700

Brian, a lot here depends on what exactly has failed for the disk drive along with whether it has caused any damage internally within the drive mechanism?

Does the drive make any unusual noises when it is running?  I am assuming it is a mechanical spinning drive where the disk platters have bearings that could be worn, or read/write heads that could have become damaged or have 'crashed' into the surface of the platter?

It is possible that only the drive logic board (the electronics you see on one side of the drive) may have started to fail and could be replaced if you had another drive of the same make & model?

If the data is really important then it might be best to avoid trying to access the drive further yourself and contact several data recovery specialists to get an estimate of what recovery might be likely to cost?

Hope the above comments are helpful!

Beginner
Posts: 2
Comments: 14

Yes, very helpful, Steve. Thanks. It makes sense to avoid attempting access, as it may only serve to corrupt things further. I won't bother you further, but will try to post back if/when data gets recovered. Enjoy the upcoming Holidays. Cheers.

Brian W